pay-to-play


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pay-to-play

 (pā′tə-plā′)
n.
Any of various arrangements in which payment is rendered in exchange for a specific right, service, or privilege, often one for which a charge would not always be expected, especially:
a. one in which participants pay to take part in a sport or game.
b. one in which entertainers, performers, or artists pay for public exposure of their work.
c. one in which political influence or appointments are given in exchange for contributions to a party or candidate.
d. one in which producers or distributors pay for favorable placements of their products.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Yang's offices said the investigation into pay-to-play allegations is continuing, although only the Fleishman-Hillard executives have been charged.
But what few deny is that there is an unofficial system of pay-to-play at work here: Give money, and more powerful people will give you a hearing.
Kennard, LAWA's whip-smart former executive director, was run out of the job in 2003 after enduring years of an imperious Airport Commission led at the time by developer and attorney Ted Stein, who was doing the bidding of then-Mayor James Hahn until the investigations of pay-to-play contracting led to his resignation.
Federal officials would not say whether the campaign reimbursement is part of their ongoing investigation in the pay-to-play allegations.
The document requests are the most recent development in a far-reaching, 18-month-long City Hall pay-to-play corruption investigation by federal and state grand juries.