Peckinpah


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Peck·in·pah

 (pĕk′ən-pô′), David Samuel Known as "Sam." 1925-1984.
American film director best known for his morally complex Westerns, including Ride the High Country (1962) and The Wild Bunch (1969).

Peckinpah

(ˈpɛkɪnˌpɑː)
n
(Biography) Sam(uel David). 1926–84, US film director, esp of Westerns, such as The Wild Bunch (1969). Among his other films are Straw Dogs (1971), Bring me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), and Cross of Iron (1977)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tipping its 10-gallon hat to Sergio Leone and Sam Peckinpah, Three Burials is a film that manages to be haunting, humane and extremely watchable all at once.
The point of the game is to hunt down baddies and lay waste to them in a manner that would make Sam Peckinpah proud.
And where do the Mexican police, Robin's overly concerned obstetrician (Dylan Kussman) and a suicidal assassin (Geoffrey Lewis, Juliette's real-life father, in a terrific small bit on a par with the best Sam Peckinpah and Don Siegel criminal losers of the '70s) fit in?
Filming started under director Sam Peckinpah but, in the first of many studio showdowns, he was replaced.
It was the only film festival in socialist countries that attracted big Hollywood stars such as Jack Nicholson, Kirk Douglas, Robert De Niro, Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda and famous directors like MiloEi Forman, Francis Ford Coppola, Roman Polanski, Sam Peckinpah, Pier Paolo Pasolini etc.
An unfortunate incident with an unhatched egg lands Red in court Judge Peckinpah (Keegan-Michael Key) sentences him to a course in management led by perky clucker Matilda (Maya Rudolph).
An unfortunate incident with an unhatched egg lands Red in court where Judge Peckinpah (Keegan-Michael Key) sentences him to a course in anger management led by perky clucker Matilda (Maya Rudolph).
Red (voiced by Jason Sudeikis) is an outcast on Bird Island, where an unfortunate incident with an unhatched egg lands Red in court where Judge Peckinpah sentences him to a course in anger management.
In 1957, when (Sam) Peckinpah wrote his screen adaptation of "The Authentic Death of Hendry Jones," he was still married to his first wife, Marie Selland, and they lived in Malibu when it was a small, funky, unpretentious beach community with nice housing that was actually affordable.
Sam Peckinpah was an American director in the 1960s and 70s known for his tumultuous personal life as much as for his films, including Pat Garret and Billy the Kid and The Wild Bunch.
Peckinpah Today: New Essays on the Films of Sam Peckinpah
It's the sort of cruel, rough-and-tough macho picture that could have been directed by Sam Peckinpah and, boy, does it grab you by the scruff of the neck.