peerie

peerie

(ˈpiːrɪ)
n
Scot a spinning top
[C19: perhaps from peir a Scot variant of pear, alluding to the top's shape]

peerie

(ˈpiːrɪ)
adj
dialect Orkney & Shetland small
[C19: of uncertain origin; perhaps from Norwegian dialect piren niggardly, thin]
References in periodicals archive ?
Pavlova, as made by the Peerie Shop Cafe in Lerwick began a revolution.
2d: He was a peerie while afore the king's men got a boat (Dennison 1880)
Poor old Rob must be birlin like a peerie trying to make sense of what all his gaffers are on about.
Not really waving, you see, but drowning, as the figure in the beaver coat scissor-strode away in clackety peerie heels.
The student, who spends his summers working in Lerwick's Peerie Shop Cafe, is also tickled by his new status as a fashion icon.
the Peerie Shop, Fine Peerie Cakes, Da Fish Bowl and Da Noost), it was rarely employed in more official sign media.
PETER LAWWELL must still be dizzy after birlin' like a peerie when Celtic's annual accounts were published.
I've a lifetime of memories of my grannies and great-aunties up on that dancefloor in their peerie heels, moving as one formidable mass.
Two middle-aged males gave tiddler for small fish while a younger woman gave peerie fish for small fish.
Anderson & Co have real Shetland knitwear and the Peerie Shop sells knitwear, books, and clothes.
Or start again with a new word: neep, scunner, outwith, Scottish, peerie .