Pelagianism


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Related to Pelagianism: Arminianism

Pe·la·gi·an·ism

 (pə-lā′jē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The theological doctrine propounded by Pelagius, a British monk, and condemned as heresy by the Roman Catholic Church in ad 416. It denied original sin and affirmed the ability of humans to be righteous by the exercise of free will.

Pe·la′gi·an adj. & n.

Pelagianism

(pɛˈleɪdʒɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a heretical doctrine, first formulated by Pelagius, that rejected the concept of original sin and maintained that the individual takes the initial steps towards salvation by his own efforts and not by the help of divine grace

Pelagianism

the heretical doctrines of Pelagius, 4th-century British monk, especially a denial of original sin and man’s fallen spiritual nature, and an assertion that man’s goodness was sufficiënt for him to work out his salva-tion without the assistance of the Holy Spirit. Cf. Semi-Pelagianism. — Pelagian, n., adj.
See also: Heresy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pelagianism - the theological doctrine put forward by Pelagius which denied original sin and affirmed the ability of humans to be righteous; condemned as heresy by the Council of Ephesus in 431
heresy, unorthodoxy - a belief that rejects the orthodox tenets of a religion
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
References in periodicals archive ?
On the issue of good works, Coronaeus's traditional Catholic position strikes the golden chord between the Calvinist Curtius, who denies the salvational role of good works, and Toralba, who falls prey to Pelagianism.
If you look at the history of the communist movement, you will be reminded of the often genocidal disputes over Arianism and Pelagianism in the ancient world, and of the religious inquisitions of the late medieval period, in which heresies were singled out and named--sometimes for the person who first committed them or made them prominent.
In that sense this is not Sartrian Pelagianism, not pure human agency, not just Feuerbach, Freud and Bloch saying God is an imaginary projection.
Following Aquinas, they contended for a middle ground between Pelagianism, which allowed human beings to achieve salvation by their own efforts, and the Reformed approach which denied humans even the capacity to choose grace.
Or as Abelard, perhaps yielding to a latent Pelagianism, had claimed, pagan philosophy might disclose more than the pagans could admit: the divinity of Christ, if not his Incarnation, might be demonstrated--albeit that might suggest a lurking deism.
To the Italian bishops, he compared this to Pelagianism, which "brings us to have trust in structures, in organizations, in perfect plans, however abstract.
I hear, in his publick notes, he hes deboirded to the Popish justification, and, in his discourses, to the grossest Pelagianism in originall sin, let be in other points of Arminianisme.
Diana Stanciu observes that in his Augustinus (1640) Cornelius Jansen saw Aristotelian notions of human nature and virtue as underpinning the resurgent Jesuit Pelagianism that he aimed to refute.
I suspect this is due in part to her conflating the Council of Trent's declarations on penitential satisfaction with the Pelagianism of the via moderna.
He appears to have played a leading role in combating Pelagianism, a teaching that cast doubt on the power of original sin and emphasised the power of human free will.
Just as Augustine's early confrontations with Manichaeism (a dualist religion that believed the cosmos to emanate from two coequal principles of goodness and evil) left their mark on the Confessions, so did his post-conversion wranglings with Pelagianism (which denied original sin and man's need of divine grace for salvation) and Donatism (which tied the efficacy of the sacraments to the moral purity of their ministers) inform his mature writings.
Pelagianism (fourth century) both contradicted the doctrine of original sin and asserted that the beginning of salvation proceeded not from grace but from human free will.