Peltier effect

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Peltier effect

(ˈpɛltɪˌeɪ)
n
(General Physics) physics the production of heat at one junction and the absorption of heat at the other junction of a thermocouple when a current is passed around the thermocouple circuit. The heat produced is additional to the heat arising from the resistance of the wires. Compare Seebeck effect
[C19: named after Jean Peltier (1785–1845), French physicist, who discovered it]
References in periodicals archive ?
It is referred to as thermoelectric or thermal EMF, also known as Thomson, Seebeck, or Peltier effects, and is caused by dissimilar metals and caloric difference.
Thin film thermoelectrics increase performance levels, particularly power densities, for both Seebeck and Peltier Effects by orders of magnitude.
Some specific topics explored are enhanced cooling in doped semiconductors due to nonlinear Peltier effects, thermoelectric properties of mixed-metal tellurides, and investigations of bonding in Skutterudites by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.