pelvic floor

(redirected from Pelvic floor muscles)
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pelvic floor

n
(Anatomy) the muscular area in the lower part of the abdomen, attached to the pelvis
References in periodicals archive ?
Sexual function and quality of life in women with urinary incontinence treated by a complete pelvic floor rehabilitation program (biofeedback, functional electrical stimulation, pelvic floor muscles exercises, and vaginal cones).
Men in the group that received biofeedback with electrical stimulation had the same visit schedule, but received additional pelvic floor training--with electrode-mediated feedback and electrical stimulation of pelvic floor muscles during each visit and daily at home.
8) This condition affects mostly women and can be due to weakened pelvic floor muscles and urethral sphincter hypermobility after childbirth, pelvic surgery, or idiopathic causes.
Patients with stress incontinence were taught to contract the pelvic floor muscles just before and after activities that caused leakage, such as coughing or lifting.
Rhonda Kotarinos has had several articles published in the area of physiotherapy approaches to pelvic floor dysfunction, including chronic pain and its myofascial origins, and Allison Ariail has a published case report article on the use of transabdominal ultrasound imaging in retraining pelvic floor muscles of a post-partum woman.
His kegel perineometer allowed women to feel, measure and develop greater control of their pelvic floor muscles.
Considering that one in three women in the UK suffer from leakage due to weak pelvic floor muscles, tonight's programme focuses on the pelvic floor.
Now imagine the balloon is your bladder and your fingers are your pelvic floor muscles and you'll understand what can cause incontinence.
Left untreated, women with injuries to pelvic floor muscles often experience musculoskeletal pain and urinary problems.
They found that training in exercises that targeted the pelvic floor muscles, which surround the urethra and rectum, helped men recover continence more quickly, compared with no training.
The pelvic floor muscles form a hammock at the base of the abdominal cavity and support the abdomino-pelvic viscera.
In particular, women will have to strengthen abdominal and pelvic floor muscles.