penitential

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pen·i·ten·tial

 (pĕn′ĭ-tĕn′shəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or expressing penitence.
2. Of or relating to penance.
n.
1. A book or set of church rules concerning the sacrament of penance.
2. A penitent.

pen′i·ten′tial·ly adv.

penitential

(ˌpɛnɪˈtɛnʃəl)
adj
of, showing, or constituting penance
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) chiefly RC Church a book or compilation of instructions for confessors
2. a less common word for penitent2, penitent3
ˌpeniˈtentially adv

pen•i•ten•tial

(ˌpɛn ɪˈtɛn ʃəl)

adj.
of, pertaining to, proceeding from, or expressive of penitence or repentance.
[1500–10; < Late Latin paenitentiālis. See penitence, -al1]
pen`i•ten′tial•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.penitential - showing or constituting penance; "penitential tears"; "wrote a penitential letter apologizing for her hasty words"
penitent, repentant - feeling or expressing remorse for misdeeds

penitential

adjective
Feeling or expressing regret for one's sins or misdeeds:
Translations

penitential

[ˌpenɪˈtenʃəl] ADJpenitencial

penitential

adjreuevoll, reumütig, reuig; (Eccl) → Buß-; a penitential acteine Bußtat

penitential

[ˌpɛnɪˈtɛnʃəl] adj (frm) (tone, look) → contrito/a; (psalm) → penitenziale
References in classic literature ?
On the present festive occasion he emerged from his room, when the blithe bells were going, the picture of misery, in a full suit of Sunday penitentials.
The next morning they are at their penitentials again; and perhaps the poor weeping wife comes over to him, either brings him some account of what his creditors are doing, and how she and the children are turned out of doors, or some other dreadful news; and this adds to his self-reproaches; but when he has thought and pored on it till he is almost mad, having no principles to support him, nothing within him or above him to comfort him, but finding it all darkness on every side, he flies to the same relief again, viz.
He first mentions a group of penitential psalms in his commentary on Psalm 6, where he writes, "Be mindful however, that this psalm is the first of [the] penitentials.
The author points out that penitentials were not a product of the church hierarchy, but instead were compiled locally and "varied from parish to parish.
Locating eleventh-century Irish manuals for administering penance in the context of ancient and early medieval theories of disease and beliefs about the debilitating powers of sin, McNeill praised the penitentials for "their moderation, fundamental humaneness, and freedom from fanaticism.
Despite the lack of consistent remaining documents, she utilizes many sources, investigating case studies, penitentials and other clerical writing to discover the ways in which justice was perceived.
She provides a brilliant instance of this elusiveness by interpreting their rigorous penitentials as hope-filled guides to spirituality.
The penitentials and the complexities of canon law are surveyed with the mastery we might expect from the two experts in these fields, Pierre J.
McNeill's The Celtic Penitentials and their Influence on Continental Christianity (Paris: Edouard Champion, 1923) and A History of the Cure of Souls (New York: Harper, 1951), Oscar Watkins's A History of Penance (London: Longmans, Green, 1920), and, although differently, studies by Thomas Oakley (1932-1940).
Hugh Connolly, author of the well-known The Irish Penitentials (1995), draws on his considerable expertise in moral theology to develop a synthetic account of sin that will meet contemporary needs.
In most popular books on `Celtic Christians' the penitentials hardly get a mention; their emphasis on humans as sinful creatures and the need for bodily mortification and their implicit strict sexual code are not perceived as agreeable with a `body-friendly' religion of `original blessing'" (49).
In contrast with the usual evaluations of Celtic penance, Connolly puts forward a theological study of the Irish penitentials that is almost totally positive.