periodic sentence

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periodic sentence

n.
A sentence in which the main clause or its predicate is withheld until the end; for example, Despite heavy winds and nearly impenetrable ground fog, the plane landed safely.

periodic sentence

(ˌpɪərɪˈɒdɪk)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric a sentence in which the completion of the main clause is left to the end, thus creating an effect of suspense

pe′ri•od′ic sen′tence

(ˈpɪər iˈɒd ɪk, ˌpɪər-)
n.
a sentence that, by leaving the completion of its main clause to the end, produces an effect of suspense, as in All alone in the world, without any money, he died.
Compare loose sentence.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.periodic sentence - a complex sentence in which the main clause comes last and is preceded by the subordinate clause
complex sentence - a sentence composed of at least one main clause and one subordinate clause