peripatetic

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Related to Peripatetics: Peripateticism, Aristotelian

per·i·pa·tet·ic

 (pĕr′ə-pə-tĕt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Walking about or from place to place; traveling on foot.
2. Peripatetic Of or relating to the philosophy or teaching methods of Aristotle, who conducted discussions while walking about in the Lyceum of ancient Athens.
n.
1. One who walks from place to place; an itinerant.
2. Peripatetic A follower of the philosophy of Aristotle; an Aristotelian.

[Middle English peripatetik, from Latin peripatēticus, from Greek peripatētikos, from peripatein, to walk about, or from peripatos, covered walk (where Aristotle allegedly lectured) : peri-, peri- + patein, to walk; see pent- in Indo-European roots.]

peripatetic

(ˌpɛrɪpəˈtɛtɪk) or

peripatetical

adj
1. itinerant
2. (Education) Brit employed in two or more educational establishments and travelling from one to another: a peripatetic football coach.
n
a peripatetic person
[C16: from Latin peripatēticus, from Greek peripatētikos, from peripatein to pace to and fro]
ˌperipaˈtetically adv

Peripatetic

(ˌpɛrɪpəˈtɛtɪk)
adj
(Philosophy) of or relating to the teachings of Aristotle, who used to teach philosophy while walking about the Lyceum in ancient Athens
n
(Philosophy) a student of Aristotelianism

per•i•pa•tet•ic

(ˌpɛr ə pəˈtɛt ɪk)

adj.
1. walking or traveling about; itinerant.
2. (cap.) of or pertaining to Aristotle, who taught philosophy while walking in the Lyceum.
3. (cap.) of or pertaining to the Aristotelian school of philosophy.
n.
4. an itinerant person.
5. (cap.) a member of the Aristotelian school.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin peripatēticus < Greek peripatētikós of Aristotle and his school, literally, walking about =peripatē- (variant s. of peripateîn to walk about =peri- peri- + pateîn to walk) + -tikos -tic]
per`i•pa•tet′i•cal•ly, adv.
per`i•pa•tet′i•cism (-əˌsɪz əm) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peripatetic - a person who walks from place to place
pedestrian, footer, walker - a person who travels by foot
2.peripatetic - a follower of Aristotle or an adherent of AristotelianismPeripatetic - a follower of Aristotle or an adherent of Aristotelianism
adherent, disciple - someone who believes and helps to spread the doctrine of another
Adj.1.peripatetic - of or relating to Aristotle or his philosophy; "Aristotelean logic"
2.peripatetic - traveling especially on foot; "peripatetic country preachers"; "a poor wayfaring stranger"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"

peripatetic

adjective travelling, wandering, roaming, migrant, mobile, roving, nomadic, itinerant, vagrant, vagabond, ambulant Her father was in the army and the family led a peripatetic existence.

peripatetic

adjective
Leading the life of a person without a fixed domicile; moving from place to place:
Translations

peripatetic

[ˌperɪpəˈtetɪk] ADJ [salesman] → ambulante; [teacher] → con trabajo en varios colegios (Philos) → peripatético
to lead a peripatetic existencecambiar mucho de domicilio, no tener residencia fija

peripatetic

[ˌpɛripəˈtɛtɪk] adj
(British) [teacher] → qui travaille dans plusieurs établissements
[salesman] → ambulant(e)

peripatetic

adjumherreisend; existencerastlos; teacheran mehreren Schulen unterrichtend attr

peripatetic

[ˌpɛrɪpəˈtɛtɪk] adj (salesman) → ambulante (Brit) (teacher) che insegna in varie scuole
References in classic literature ?
To sage Philosophy next lend thine ear, From heaven descended to the low-roofed house Of Socrates--see there his tenement-- Whom, well inspired, the Oracle pronounced Wisest of men; from whose mouth issued forth Mellifluous streams, that watered all the schools Of Academics old and new, with those Surnamed Peripatetics, and the sect Epicurean, and the Stoic severe.
We know already that 'Spreadsheet Phil' has nothing to offer except austerity, sweat and tears, so I don't see the point of his patronising peripatetics.
Authors like Prioreschi, for example, contradicts him, mentioning other schools that also condemned suicide: Academics, Peripatetics and Epicureans (8).
Philosophers, Academics, Peripatetics, Stoics, Epicureans and, in Judea,
Cicero was an eclectic who had sympathy with *Stoicism, the * Peripatetics, and the *scepticism of the *Academy, but was opposed to the system of *Epicurus.
39) Stoics, like some other philosophers who were active teachers continued to be respected, as shown for example by the inscription of 122/1 BC commending ephebes to Stoics, Academics and Peripatetics as teachers, (40) and individuals could be honoured for their role as intellectuals, or at least as fairly harmless eccentrics.
It is [in this sense that] "whiteness" is not predicated of [the whiteness] of snow and of that of ivory as a pure univocal ('ala t-tawatu' al-mutlaq), and "philosophy" is not predicated of [the philosophy] of the Peripatetics and of that of the Stoics as a pure univocal.
One follows the characters in their peripatetics with assurance, until it becomes clear that they are not the people one understood them to be.
199) After a friend initiated a meeting in 1890, however, Annie Jonas Wells was elected president of a new, serious women's literary society--the Peripatetics, composed of Protestant women and organized along the same lines as Friends in Council.
His familiarity with Aristotle was such that he refers, in his treatise on education, the Metalogicon, directly to the 'Aristotilici', as well as to the teachings of the Peripatetics and 'the Philosopher'.
Like real Peripatetics will could discuss mathematics in the open air as for instance on the picturesque Tuscan hills or the refreshing Abruzzo woodlands.
Casimir M J, 1992, "The dimensions of territoriality: an introduction", in Mobility and Territoriality: Social and Spatial Boundaries Among Foragers, Fishers, Pastorals and Peripatetics Eds M J Casimir, A Rao (Berg, Oxford) pp 1-26