Permian period


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Permian period

The last period of the Paleozoic era: 286 to 248 million years ago.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Permian period - from 280 million to 230 million years agoPermian period - from 280 million to 230 million years ago; reptiles
Paleozoic, Paleozoic era - from 544 million to about 230 million years ago
References in periodicals archive ?
Burger's samples painted a grim picture of Earth's environment at the end of the Permian period.
The ancient reptiles lived during the Early Permian period and could "detach their tails to escape the grasp of predators.
Visitors will learn about the terrestrial world of the Early Permian Period, and the animals that roamed the tidal flats of the ancient oceans.
A nurse and a postman provided me with the best accounts of the creature, which I believe to be a time-displaced specimen of estemmenosuchus - a prehistoric mammal which roamed our world around 267 million years ago in the permian period.
At the close of the Permian period some 252 million years ago, more than 90 percent of all marine species and roughly 75 percent of all land species vanished.
Botanical affinities of isolated palynomorphs included in this paper indicate the presence of sphenopsids (Equisetopsids) and ferns (Osmundaceae) during the early Permian period along with gymnosperms (Cycadales, Benniettitales).
The worst was at the end of the Permian period, 250 million years ago, when perhaps 90 per cent of species were wiped out.
When the team mapped the animals on an evolutionary tree, they found that four of the groups showed a tremendous increase in size during the Permian Period, at the end of the Paleozoic Era.
Bogda Mountain transformed from an early rift to an early foreland basin during the Carboniferous-Early Permian period.
About 252 million years ago, the end of the Permian period brought about a worldwide collapse known as the Great Dying, during which a vast majority of species went extinct.
4) Ammonoids were devastated by the largest extinction in Earth's history, at the end of the Permian Period, as well as Late Cretaceous mass extinction.
The cliffs began life as limey mud on the floor of a shallow, warm tropical sea more than 250 million years ago during the Permian period.