Peter Pan

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Peter Pan

n
a youthful, boyish, or immature man
[C20: after the main character in Peter Pan (1904), a play by J. M. Barrie]

Pe′ter Pan′


n.
the hero of Sir James M. Barrie's play (1904) about a boy who never grew up.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Peter Pan - a boyish or immature manPeter Pan - a boyish or immature man; after the boy in Barrie's play who never grows up
adult male, man - an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman); "there were two women and six men on the bus"
2.Peter Pan - the main character in a play and novel by J. M. Barrie; a boy who won't grow up
Translations

Peter Pan

[ˌpiːtəˈpæn] NPeter Pan m, niño m eterno
References in classic literature ?
If you ask your mother whether she knew about Peter Pan when she was a little girl she will say, "Why, of course, I did, child," and if you ask her whether he rode on a goat in those days she will say, "What a foolish question to ask, certainly he did.
In this story of Peter Pan, for instance, the bald narrative and most of the moral reflections are mine, though not all, for this boy can be a stern moralist, but the interesting bits about the ways and customs of babies in the bird-stage are mostly reminiscences of David's, recalled by pressing his hands to his temples and thinking hard.
Well, Peter Pan got out by the window, which had no bars.
Poor little Peter Pan, he sat down and cried, and even then he did not know that, for a bird, he was sitting on his wrong part.
to the bird that flies away with the big crust, you know now that you ought not to do this, for he is very likely taking it to Peter Pan.
There never was a simpler happier family until the coming of Peter Pan.
Darling did not know, but after thinking back into her childhood she just remembered a Peter Pan who was said to live with the fairies.
She started up with a cry, and saw the boy, and somehow she knew at once that he was Peter Pan.
If so, Peter Pan sees them when he is sailing across the lake in the Thrush's Nest.
You have seen pantomimes and Peter Pan, perhaps; perhaps, too, a play of Shakespeare, - a comedy, it may be, which made you laugh, or even a tragedy which made you want to cry, or at least left you sad.
A RUGBY club is aiming to break the world record for the largest gathering of Peter Pans.