petiole

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Related to Petioles: phyllode

pet·i·ole

 (pĕt′ē-ōl′)
n.
1. Botany The stalk by which a leaf is attached to a stem. Also called leafstalk.
2. Zoology A slender, stalklike part, as that connecting the thorax and abdomen in certain insects.

[Latin petiolus, variant of peciolus, little foot, fruit stalk, probably from *pediciolus, diminutive of pediculus; see pedicel.]

pet′i·oled′ adj.

petiole

(ˈpɛtɪˌəʊl)
n
1. (Botany) the stalk by which a leaf is attached to the rest of the plant
2. (Zoology) zoology a slender stalk or stem, such as the connection between the thorax and abdomen of ants
[C18: via French from Latin petiolus little foot, from pēs foot]

pet•i•ole

(ˈpɛt iˌoʊl)

n.
1. the slender stalk by which a leaf is attached to the stem; leafstalk.
2. a stalk or peduncle, as that connecting the abdomen and thorax in wasps.
[1745–55; < New Latin petiolus, Latin petiolus,peciolus, probably for *pediciolus, diminutive of pediculus pedicle]

pet·i·ole

(pĕt′ē-ōl′)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.petiole - the slender stem that supports the blade of a leafpetiole - the slender stem that supports the blade of a leaf
stalk, stem - a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ
phyllode - an expanded petiole taking on the function of a leaf blade
Translations

petiole

nStängel m

petiole

[ˈpɛtɪˌəʊl] npicciolo
References in classic literature ?
In walking across these thick beds of mimosae, a broad track was marked by the change of shade, produced by the drooping of their sensitive petioles.
Wilmer Barrera and David Picha from Louisiana State University analysed a variety of sweet potato tissue types - mature leaves, young leaves, young petioles, buds and root tissue.
One-centimeter-long explants of leaves, petioles and nodes from field as well as in vitro shoots of S.
Soybean plant tissues were placed on top of the agar for the experiments and included 1) expanding and 2) fully expanded trifoliates from the top two-thirds of the plant, 3) flowers (R1-R2), 4) immature pods (a mixture of R3-R4), 5) developed pods with developing seeds (R5), 6) pods with developed seeds (R6), 7) stems, and 8) petioles from the top two-thirds of the plant.
The plants tend to develop thin stems and petioles, and become spindly.
The petiole length was also measured as an average of ten leaf petioles per tree, measured from the base of the leaf blade to the stem.
Developed by researchers at Columbia University, University of Maryland, and Smithsonian Institution, the free app includes high-resolution images of leaves, flowers, fruits, petioles, seeds, and bark to help with tree identification.
Drymonia squamosa differs from other species of Drymonia by dense clusters of scales on the petioles, glabrate leaf blades with minute punctations on the lower surface, calyx appearing swollen at base with lanceolate lobes, corolla villous to lanate, and style with glandular trichomes.
with short internodes; cataphylls not seen; petioles D-shaped, 45 cm long, 5 mm diam.