phage

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Related to Phages: Bacteriophage therapy

phage

 (fāj)
n.
A bacteriophage.

phage

(feɪdʒ)
n
(Microbiology) short for bacteriophage

phage

(feɪdʒ)

n.
[by shortening]

-phage

a combining form meaning “a thing that devours,” used esp. in the names of viruses and phagocytes: bacteriophage; macrophage.
[n. use of Greek -phagos -phagous]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phage - a virus that is parasitic (reproduces itself) in bacteria; "phage uses the bacterium's machinery and energy to produce more phage until the bacterium is destroyed and phage is released to invade surrounding bacteria"
virus - (virology) ultramicroscopic infectious agent that replicates itself only within cells of living hosts; many are pathogenic; a piece of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein
coliphage - a bacteriophage that infects the bacterium Escherichia coli
typhoid bacteriophage - a bacteriophage specific for the bacterium Salmonella typhi
Translations

phage

[ˈfeɪdʒ] n (=bacteriophage) → phage m

phage

n. bacteriófago.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bacteria with a robust CRISPR system usually resist attacks by viruses known as bacteriophages, or simply phages.
One avenue available involves the use of bacteriophages, also known as phages.
The phages released from the dead bacterium can then infect other host cells," Clokie said.
Given the richness of bacteria in the human gut, it is not surprising that scientists have found that phages also are highly prevalent there.
In the 1920s and 1930s, before widespread use of antibiotics, physicians successfully treated a variety of infections with bacteriophages, or phages for short.
Among the topics are diseases caused by phages, phages and bacterial epidemiology, phages as therapeutic delivery vehicles, bacteriophage-based methods of detecting and identifying bacteria, phage therapy of wounds and related purulent infections, and the role of phages in controlling bacterial pathogens in food.
However, phages also participate in the horizontal transfer of genes among bacteria because their genome can harbour other genes than those strictly required for their life cycle.
The phages were isolated from raw sewage at a municipal sewage treatment plant, by the method of Smith and Huggins.
The first volume features 25 chapters by 43 international academics and researchers focusing on the isolation of phages from a range of environments, their morphological and molecular characterization, and methods for the investigation of their interaction with bacteria.
These phages are environmentally ubiquitous and only attack bacteria.
Sharma has completed testing a cocktail of phages (ECP-100) on refrigerated samples of fresh-cut cantaloupe.
Lytic phages multiply until the bacterial membrane bursts apart, releasing endotoxins (produced by the bacterium in self-defense) and a new population of bacteriophages.