Philadelphia


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Phil·a·del·phi·a

 (fĭl′ə-dĕl′fē-ə)
1. An ancient city northeast of the Dead Sea in modern-day Jordan. The chief city of the Ammonites, it was enlarged and embellished by Ptolemy II Philadelphus (285-246 bc) and named in honor of him. Amman, the capital of Jordan, is now on the site.
2. An ancient Greek city of Asia Minor in present-day western Turkey. Founded in the second century bc, Philadelphia was a center of early Christianity.
3. The largest city of Pennsylvania, in the southeast part of the state on the Delaware River. It was founded as a Quaker colony by William Penn in 1681 on the site of an earlier Swedish settlement. The First and Second Continental Congresses (1774 and 1775-1776) and the Constitutional Convention (1787) met in the city, which served as the capital of the United States from 1790 to 1800.

Phil′a·del′phi·an adj. & n.

Philadelphia

(ˌfɪləˈdɛlfɪə)
n
(Placename) a city and port in SE Pennsylvania, at the confluence of the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers: the fourth largest city in the US; founded by Quakers in 1682; cultural and financial centre of the American colonies and the federal capital (1790–1800); scene of the Continental Congresses (1774–83) and the signing of the Declaration of Independence (1776). Pop: 1 479 339 (2003 est)

Phil•a•del•phi•a

(ˌfɪl əˈdɛl fi ə)

n.
a city in SE Pennsylvania, on the Delaware River. 1,478,002.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Philadelphia - the largest city in PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia - the largest city in Pennsylvania; located in the southeastern part of the state on the Delaware river; site of Independence Hall where the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were signed; site of the University of Pennsylvania
Benjamin Franklin Bridge - a suspension bridge across the Delaware River
Independence Hall - the building in Philadelphia where the Declaration of Independence was signed
Walt Whitman Bridge - a suspension bridge across the Delaware River
Keystone State, Pennsylvania, PA - a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies
Translations
Filadelfie
Philadelphie
פילדלפיה

Philadelphia

[ˌfɪləˈdelfɪə] NFiladelfia f
References in classic literature ?
The four railways from Philadelphia and Washington, Harrisburg and Wheeling, which converge at Baltimore, whirled away the heterogeneous population to the four corners of the United States, and the city subsided into comparative tranquility.
The book which he had published at Philadelphia, on the "Dissociation of Matter by Electric Action," had aroused opposition throughout the whole scientific world.
During the fifteen years of his literary life Poe was connected with various newspapers and magazines in Richmond, Philadelphia and New York.
THE journey from New York to Philadelphia, is made by railroad, and two ferries; and usually occupies between five and six hours.
After the telephone had been born in Boston, baptized in the Patent Office, and given a royal reception at the Philadelphia Centennial, it might be supposed that its life thenceforth would be one of peace and pleasantness.
I have seen a man fell a pine, when he has been in want of fencing stuff, and roll his first cuts into the gap, where he left it to rot, though its top would have made rails enough to answer his purpose, and its butt would have sold in the Philadelphia market for twenty dollars.
On my passage, I paid particular attention to the direction which the steamboats took to go to Philadelphia.
Still continuing no less attached to union than enamored of liberty, they observed the danger which immediately threatened the former and more remotely the latter; and being pursuaded that ample security for both could only be found in a national government more wisely framed, they as with one voice, convened the late convention at Philadelphia, to take that important subject under consideration.
A Continental Congress assembled at Philadelphia,'' said Grandfather, "and proposed such measures as they thought most conducive to the public good.
Among other volumes of verse on the top shelf of the bookcase, of which I used to look at the outside without penetrating deeply within, were Pope's translation of the Iliad and the Odyssey, and Dryden's Virgil, pretty little tomes in tree-calf, published by James Crissy in Philadelphia, and illustrated with small copper-plates, which somehow seemed to put the matter hopelessly beyond me.
Their Congress, assembled at Philadelphia, once--twice--had petitioned the king; had remonstrated to Parliament; had addressed the people of Britain, for the rights of Englishmen-- in vain.
China was appealed to and threatened by the United Powers, and that was all the Convention of Philadelphia came to; and the Convention and the Powers were laughed at by China.

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