philanthropist

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phi·lan·thro·py

 (fĭ-lăn′thrə-pē)
n. pl. phi·lan·thro·pies
1. The effort or inclination to increase the well-being of humankind, as by charitable aid or donations.
2. Love of humankind in general.
3. Something, such as an activity or institution, intended to promote human welfare.

[Late Latin philanthrōpia, from Greek, from philanthrōpos, humane, benevolent : phil-, philo-, philo- + anthrōpos, man, mankind.]

phi·lan′thro·pist n.

phi•lan•thro•pist

(fɪˈlæn θrə pɪst)

n.
a person who practices philanthropy.
[1720–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.philanthropist - someone who makes charitable donations intended to increase human well-beingphilanthropist - someone who makes charitable donations intended to increase human well-being
bestower, conferrer, donor, giver, presenter - person who makes a gift of property

philanthropist

noun humanitarian, patron, benefactor, giver, donor, contributor, altruist, almsgiver He is a philanthropist and patron of the arts.
Translations
مُحْسِن، مُحِب للبَشَر
lidumilfilantrop
filantropistvelgører
čovjekoljubacfilantropfilantropkinja
emberbarát
mannvinur; góîgerîarmaîur
filantropľudomil
insansever kimse

philanthropist

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪst] Nfilántropo/a m/f

philanthropist

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪst] nphilanthrope m/f

philanthropist

nMenschenfreund(in) m(f), → Philanthrop(in) m(f) (geh)

philanthropist

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪst] nfilantropo/a

philanthropy

(fiˈlanθrəpi) noun
love for mankind, usually as shown by money given to, or work done for, other people. He shows his philanthropy by helping people who have been in prison.
philanthropic (filənˈθropik) adjective
giving money or other help etc to others. a philanthropic person; a philanthropic act.
phiˈlanthropist noun
a philanthropic person.
References in classic literature ?
What I saw in him -- as evidently as the indestructible ramparts of Old Ticonderoga, already cited as the most appropriate simile -- was the features of stubborn and ponderous endurance, which might well have amounted to obstinacy in his earlier days; of integrity, that, like most of his other endowments, lay in a somewhat heavy mass, and was just as unmalleable or unmanageable as a ton of iron ore; and of benevolence which, fiercely as he led the bayonets on at Chippewa or Fort Erie, I take to be of quite as genuine a stamp as what actuates any or all the polemical philanthropists of the age.
But when the swift Pequod, with a fresh leading wind, was herself in hot chase; how very kind of these tawny philanthropists to assist in speeding her on to her own chosen pursuit, -- mere riding-whips and rowels to her, that they were.
How much this accident meant to Jurgis he realized only by stages; for he found that the harvester works were the sort of place to which philanthropists and reformers pointed with pride.
1759-1833), English philanthropists and anti-slavery agitators who helped to secure passage of the Emancipation Bill by Parliament in 1833.
To this section belong economists, philanthropists, humanitarians, improvers of the condition of the working class, organisers of charity, members of societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals, temperance fanatics, hole-and-corner reformers of every imaginable kind.
On the other hand, I must plead, for I have an affectionate partiality towards the rector's memory, that he was not vindictive--and some philanthropists have been so; that he was not intolerant--and there is a rumour that some zealous theologians have not been altogether free from that blemish; that although he would probably have declined to give his body to be burned in any public cause, and was far from bestowing all his goods to feed the poor, he had that charity which has sometimes been lacking to very illustrious virtue--he was tender to other men's failings, and unwilling to impute evil.
But when these philanthropists send us such glowing accounts of one half of their labours, why does their modesty restrain them from publishing the other half of the good they have wrought?
There was an unlimited range of society--the powerful, the wise, the witty, and the famous in every walk of life; princes, presidents, poets, generals, artists, actors, and philanthropists,--all making their own market at the fair, and deeming no price too exorbitant for such commodities as hit their fancy.
Jarndyce, who is desirous to aid any work that is considered likely to be a good work and who is much sought after by philanthropists, has, I believe, a very high opinion of Mrs.
Malthus was a friend of humanity, but, with ill-founded moral principles, the friend of humanity is the devourer of humanity, without mentioning his pride; for, touch the vanity of one of these numberless philanthropists, and to avenge his self-esteem, he will be ready at once to set fire to the whole globe; and to tell the truth, we are all more or less like that.
Two or three decades ago social philosophers and statisticians and well-meaning philanthropists were still talking and writing about the deportation of the Negroes, or about their settlement within some restricted area, or about their settling in all parts of the Union, or about their decline through their neglect of their children, or about their rapid multiplication till they should expel the whites from the South--of every sort of nonsense under heaven.
And if this is true of the sons, even the daughters, even in the nineteenth century, are apt to become people of importance-- philanthropists and educationalists if they are spinsters, and the wives of distinguished men if they marry.