philanthropist

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phi·lan·thro·py

 (fĭ-lăn′thrə-pē)
n. pl. phi·lan·thro·pies
1. The effort or inclination to increase the well-being of humankind, as by charitable aid or donations.
2. Love of humankind in general.
3. Something, such as an activity or institution, intended to promote human welfare.

[Late Latin philanthrōpia, from Greek, from philanthrōpos, humane, benevolent : phil-, philo-, philo- + anthrōpos, man, mankind.]

phi·lan′thro·pist n.

phi•lan•thro•pist

(fɪˈlæn θrə pɪst)

n.
a person who practices philanthropy.
[1720–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.philanthropist - someone who makes charitable donations intended to increase human well-beingphilanthropist - someone who makes charitable donations intended to increase human well-being
bestower, conferrer, donor, giver, presenter - person who makes a gift of property

philanthropist

noun humanitarian, patron, benefactor, giver, donor, contributor, altruist, almsgiver He is a philanthropist and patron of the arts.
Translations
مُحْسِن، مُحِب للبَشَر
lidumilfilantrop
filantropistvelgører
čovjekoljubacfilantropfilantropkinja
emberbarát
mannvinur; góîgerîarmaîur
filantropľudomil
insansever kimse

philanthropist

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪst] Nfilántropo/a m/f

philanthropist

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪst] nphilanthrope m/f

philanthropist

nMenschenfreund(in) m(f), → Philanthrop(in) m(f) (geh)

philanthropist

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪst] nfilantropo/a

philanthropy

(fiˈlanθrəpi) noun
love for mankind, usually as shown by money given to, or work done for, other people. He shows his philanthropy by helping people who have been in prison.
philanthropic (filənˈθropik) adjective
giving money or other help etc to others. a philanthropic person; a philanthropic act.
phiˈlanthropist noun
a philanthropic person.
References in classic literature ?
We have,"' the old lady read on with a little extra emphasis, '"a meeting of our Convened Chief Composite Committee of Central and District Philanthropists, at our Head Haven as above; and it is their unanimous pleasure that I take the chair.
There are men in the world," Wingrave continued, "called philanthropists, amiable, obese creatures as a rule, whose professed aim in life it is to do as much good as possible.
Jarndyce, who is desirous to aid any work that is considered likely to be a good work and who is much sought after by philanthropists, has, I believe, a very high opinion of Mrs.
Not that we are philanthropists, but that we need the investors in our big development scheme.
The last were not England's best men and women; only, perhaps, her best philanthropists.
To this section belong economists, philanthropists, humanitarians, improvers of the condition of the working class, organisers of charity, members of societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals, temperance fanatics, hole-and-corner reformers of every imaginable kind.
Two or three decades ago social philosophers and statisticians and well-meaning philanthropists were still talking and writing about the deportation of the Negroes, or about their settlement within some restricted area, or about their settling in all parts of the Union, or about their decline through their neglect of their children, or about their rapid multiplication till they should expel the whites from the South--of every sort of nonsense under heaven.
And if this is true of the sons, even the daughters, even in the nineteenth century, are apt to become people of importance-- philanthropists and educationalists if they are spinsters, and the wives of distinguished men if they marry.
A GREAT Philanthropist who had thought of himself in connection with the Presidency and had introduced a bill into Congress requiring the Government to loan every voter all the money that he needed, on his personal security, was explaining to a Sunday-school at a railway station how much he had done for the country, when an angel looked down from Heaven and wept.
For though Sir Aaron was a philanthropist, and thus dealt with the darker side of our society, he prided himself on dealing with it in the brightest possible style.
If I can't, I'll save on something else," returned the jocose philanthropist.
I assure you that the most winning woman I ever knew was hanged for poisoning three little children for their insurance-money, and the most repellant man of my acquaintance is a philanthropist who has spent nearly a quarter of a million upon the London poor.