agrimony

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ag·ri·mo·ny

 (ăg′rə-mō′nē)
n. pl. ag·ri·mo·nies
1. Any of various perennial herbaceous plants of the genus Agrimonia in the rose family, having pinnately compound leaves and spikelike clusters of small yellow flowers.
2. Any of several similar or related plants, such as the hemp agrimony.

[Middle English, from Old French aigremoine, from Latin agrimōnia (influenced by Old French aigre, sour), alteration of argemōnia, from Greek argemōnē, poppy, possibly from argos, white; see arg- in Indo-European roots.]

agrimony

(ˈæɡrɪmənɪ)
n
1. (Plants) any of various N temperate rosaceous plants of the genus Agrimonia, which have compound leaves, long spikes of small yellow flowers, and bristly burlike fruits
2. (Plants) any of several other plants, such as hemp agrimony
[C15: altered from egrimonie (C14), via Old French from Latin agrimōnia, variant of argemōnia from Greek argemōnē poppy]

ag•ri•mo•ny

(ˈæg rəˌmoʊ ni)

n., pl. -nies.
any plant belonging to the genus Agrimonia, of the rose family, esp. the perennial A. eupatoria, having pinnate leaves and small, yellow flowers.
[1350–1400; < Middle French aigremoine < Latin agrimōnia, argemōnia < Greek argemṓnē poppy]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agrimony - a plant of the genus Agrimonia having spikelike clusters of small yellow flowersagrimony - a plant of the genus Agrimonia having spikelike clusters of small yellow flowers
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Agrimonia - genus of herbs found chiefly in north temperate regions having pinnate leaves and yellow flowers followed by bristly fruit
Agrimonia eupatoria, harvest-lice - erect perennial Old World herb of dry grassy habitats
Agrimonia procera, fragrant agrimony - fragrant European perennial herb found at woodland margins on moist soils
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Philanthropos, The History of Harry Spencer; Compiled for the Amusement of good Children, and the Instruction of such as wish to become good (Dublin: John Gough, 1794), pp.
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