Philippism

Philippism

Rare. the doctrines of Philip Melanchthon, 16th-century German Protestant reformer, especially his rebuttals to the allegations of the Flacians that his attitude toward certain teachings of Martin Luther was adiaphoristic. — Philippist, n. — Philippistic, adj.
See also: Protestantism
References in periodicals archive ?
The best compact introduction to the Philippism as a distinctive anti-confessional movement is Peterson, 1996.
Before this dogmatic part there is a concise, insightful history of the Old Reformed confessions, starting with Zwingli, Calvin, and Bullinger and moving on to the spread of Calvinism and Philippism in Western and Eastern Europe, the Dordrecht Synod (1618-19) and the theology of the Netherlands, English Puritanism, and the School of Saumur and the Helvetic Consensus Formula of 1675 (part 1; 9-28).
Rohls first traces the development of the Old Reformed confessional writings, beginning with Zwingli and German-speaking Switzerland, moving on to Calvin and Bullinger and the spread of Calvinism, to Philippism and German Reformed Theology, the Synod of Dort, English Puritanism, the School of Saumur, and the Helvetic Consensus Formula.
Stillman, "Deadl y Stinging Adders: Sidney's Piety, Philippism, and the Defense of Poesy"; and Matthew Steggle, "Weighing Winged Words: An Intertext in The Faerie Queene V.
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