Philoctetes


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Philoctetes

(ˌfɪlɒkˈtiːtiːz; fɪˈlɒktɪˌtiːz)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a hero of the Trojan War, in which he killed Paris with the bow and poisoned arrows given to him by Hercules
References in classic literature ?
Aeschylus in his Philoctetes says: {Phi alpha gamma epsilon delta alpha iota nu alpha /
They say the Myrmidons returned home safely under Achilles' son Neoptolemus; so also did the valiant son of Poias, Philoctetes.
The famous Hercules was one, and so was Achilles, and Philoctetes likewise, and Aesculapius, who acquired immense repute as a doctor.
And those that held Methone and Thaumacia, with Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these were led by the skilful archer Philoctetes, and they had seven ships, each with fifty oarsmen all of them good archers; but Philoctetes was lying in great pain in the Island of Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans left him, for he had been bitten by a poisonous water snake.
His work included the adjudgment of the arms of Achilles to Odysseus, the madness of Aias, the bringing of Philoctetes from Lemnos and his cure, the coming to the war of Neoptolemus who slays Eurypylus, son of Telephus, the making of the wooden horse, the spying of Odysseus and his theft, along with Diomedes, of the Palladium: the analysis concludes with the admission of the wooden horse into Troy by the Trojans.
She wanted to know if Philoctetes had a sister, and why
It's about Philoctetes, the lame man I was telling you of yesterday," he answered, resting his head on his hand, and looking at her as if he were not at all sorry to be interrupted.
He identifies with Philoctetes as a metaphor of an artist endowed with a supernatural gift (Heracles's bow), but unacceptable to society (owing to the stench of a festering wound).
By no means is Caliban accepted into the family of man; rather he is claimed as Philoctetes might claim his own festering wound.
It is like touching a wound, or like being wounded in the foot, like Philoctetes.
In the chapter on the Philoctetes, McCoy shows how two heroes, young and old, have opportunities to learn virtue.
July 8, 11 and 12 sees Sophocles' tragedy Philoctetes performed at all three venues in turn, closely followed on July 13 and 14 by Aristophanes' popular comedy, Lysistrata, staged at Curium.