piarist


Also found in: Wikipedia.
Related to piarist: apiarist

piarist

(ˈpiːərɪst)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) theol a member of a Roman religious order which aims to educate the poor
References in periodicals archive ?
Before the memorial march, Piarist monk Lajos Kernyi stated at Kossuth tr: all totalitarian regimes want human beings to stop being human beings, to stop having a will of their own, and to be reduced to a mere number.
He wears a dark cassock with round white collar, this in keeping with his having become a Piarist monk at the age of eighteen.
Devon Prep is a private, Catholic, college preparatory school for young men in grades six to 12 conducted by the Piarist Fathers.
He added that he had examined archives belonging to the Piarist order after its foundation in Florence in 1621 and found "depressing parallels" with cases of abuse in the 1970s and 1980s.
Barsanti received his education from the Piarist religious order, which was dedicated to providing free education for poor children.
It was your children he boarded in the Piarist schools, paying out of his own pocket for their togs and victuals, then securing their preferments at his own expense.
As a boy he had absorbed the curriculum taught by the Piarist Fathers, including lessons on John Locke and the classics which, according to Storozynski, were particularly influential in shaping his views.
For instance, on 30 July 1848, in the camp on the River Drava, Pius Horvath, a Piarist priest, taught the national guards gathered for the service how important it was to maintain unity.
The devious and complicated workings of the Vatican, and the internal corruptions of the Catholic Church enabled the sexual abuse of children (practiced by some of the leading priests) which lead to the disgrace and abolition of the Piarist Order in 1646 by Pope Innocent X.
Father Joseph Calasanz, a canonized saint and founder of the Piarist Order, in a 1631 letter to the headmaster of one of the Piarist schools about a priest accused of sexually abusing students (Documented in Fallen Order by Karen Liebreich, Atlantic Monthly Press, 2004)
Jesuit, Piarist and Minorite comedies are of a large number; about half of these plays do not give any moral.
Other works by "Fischer" turn up in collections and inventories of music associated with former Kreuzherren, Cistercian, and Piarist establishments in Bohemia and Moravia.