picaresque

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pic·a·resque

 (pĭk′ə-rĕsk′, pē′kə-)
adj.
1. Of or involving clever rogues or adventurers.
2. Of or relating to a genre of usually satiric prose fiction originating in Spain and depicting in realistic, often humorous detail the adventures of a roguish hero of low social degree living by his or her wits in a corrupt society.
n.
One that is picaresque.

[French, from Spanish picaresco, from pícaro, picaro; see picaro.]

picaresque

(ˌpɪkəˈrɛsk)
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of or relating to a type of fiction in which the hero, a rogue, goes through a series of episodic adventures. It originated in Spain in the 16th century
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of or involving rogues or picaroons
[C19: via French from Spanish picaresco, from pícaro a rogue]

pic•a•resque

(ˌpɪk əˈrɛsk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a form of prose fiction, orig. developed in Spain, in which the adventures of a roguish hero are described in a series of usu. humorous or satiric episodes.
2. of, pertaining to, or resembling rogues.
[1800–10; < Sp picaresco]

picaresque

A genre in which a roguish hero or heroine goes through a series of adventures.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.picaresque - involving clever rogues or adventurers especially as in a type of fiction; "picaresque novels"; "waifs of the picaresque tradition"; "a picaresque hero"
dishonest, dishonorable - deceptive or fraudulent; disposed to cheat or defraud or deceive
Translations
pikarisch

picaresque

[ˌpɪkəˈresk] ADJpicaresco

picaresque

adjpikaresk; picaresque novelSchelmenroman m, → pikaresker Roman

picaresque

[ˌpɪkəˈrɛsk] adj (liter) → picaresco/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The Picaresque Novel in Western Literature: From the Sixteenth Century to the Neopicaresqu.
The trouble with the "Glasgow Version" is that it tries to re-write an epic as a picaresque novel.
Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature at Berkeley, Robert Alter is the author of twenty-three books on such subjects as Stendhal, Kafka, Benjamin, Scholem, the picaresque novel, the theory of narrative, and various novelists' takes on urban experience.
His most famous work is his bawdy picaresque novel, the Metamorphoses, otherwise known as The Golden Ass.
The questions of Guzman as picaresque novel and the degree to which it should be ranked alongside Don Quijote as the first modern novels are also addressed again.
Among the topics are Inquisition and the creation of the Other, conflicted identity and colonial adaptation in Petrus Alfonsi's Dialogus contra judaeos and Disciplina clericalis, the converso element in the Summa de paciencia (1493) and the Thesoro de la passion (1494), the converso and the Spanish picaresque novel, and Don Quijote and the Hebrew scriptures.
The male picaresque's unbreakable bonds with its degraded past, which leaves the picaro constantly threatened by his return to what has been repressed in the text, is simultaneously paralleled and challenged in the female picaresque novel.
Picaresque novel don't often immerse you in a place or social milieu, preferring instead to show the surface in rapid, light strokes.
DR: Yes, I did have in mind an archetypal motif of the journey as crucial to the story and in fact of a picaresque novel, to some degree.
Reinventing the Spanish picaresque novel, he creates a tough, resourceful heroine, Maria/Aisha, a beautiful crypto-Muslim orphan kidnapped and sold into slavery at thirteen in 1576.
His major international breakthrough came in 1959 with his allegorical and wide-ranging picaresque novel The Tin Drum (filmed by Schla.
To analyze Aridjis's use of the Jews' ordeal in Spain, we may compare aspects of Aridjis's picaresque novel with the 1554 picaresque prototype, primarily highlighting differences in style and sexuality.