Pictish


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Pict·ish

 (pĭk′tĭsh)
adj.
Of or relating to the Picts or their language or culture.
n.
The language of the Picts, of uncertain affiliation, known chiefly from place names and extinct by the tenth century.

Pictish

(ˈpɪktɪʃ)
n
(Languages) the language of the Picts, of which few records survive. Its origins are much disputed and it was extinct by about 900 ad
adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to the Picts

Pict•ish

(ˈpɪk tɪʃ)

n.
1. the sparsely attested language or languages of the Picts, elements of which are apparently akin to British Celtic.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to the Picts or their speech.
[1700–10]
Translations

Pictish

[ˈpɪktɪʃ]
A. ADJpicto
B. Npicto m

Pictish

adjpiktisch
n (Ling) → Piktisch nt
References in classic literature ?
And from there his eager, wandering priests carried the story far and wide, northward to the fortress of the Pictish kings, and southward to the wild Saxons who dwelt amid the hills and uplands of Northumbria.
8% of all Welshmen had close links with the Pictish marker of the Maeatae.
But I was soon off on a Pictish Trail swapping Irish for Scottish folktronix with Fence Collective Johnny Lynch taking us round his home on the Isle of Eigg and back.
A ROCKY sea stack near a famous clifftop castle has been confirmed as Scotland's oldest Pictish fort.
SWEET BABOO AND THE PICTISH TRAIL: The Musician, Clyde St, Leicester.
The Pictish victory marked their independence from Northumbria.
His Fence Records compadre Johnny Lynch, also known as The Pictish Trail, left to form Lost Map Records and took some of their bands with him.
The first people on Orkney would have spoken a Pictish language which disappeared when the Norse settlers arrived in the 900s.
CARDIFF Archaeological Society welcomes Dr Meggen Gondek, reader in archaeology at the University of Chester, for a lecture on Pictish art and power: discovering a "royal centre" at Rhynie, Aberdeenshire.
In spite of these 'problems' the scale of archaeological investigation has been frustratingly slight (Carver 2011), and the model of Pictish social formation has largely followed that of other, better documented, British and Irish regions: envisaging a shift from locally based power to more direct regional (and national) control, influenced and stabilised by the adoption of Christianity (Warner 1988: 57; Alcock 2003).
Also playing on the Mountain Stage today are the Tune-Yard, King Creosote and Jon Hopkins, Amien Jurado, Ghostpoet, The Pictish Trail and Seamus Fogart.