pidgin

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pidg·in

 (pĭj′ən)
n.
A simplified form of speech that is usually a mixture of two or more languages, has a rudimentary grammar and vocabulary, is used for communication between groups speaking different languages, and is not spoken as a first or native language. Also called contact language.


pidg′in·i·za′tion n.
pidg′in·ize′ v.

pidgin

(ˈpɪdʒɪn)
n
(Linguistics) a language made up of elements of two or more other languages and used for contacts, esp trading contacts, between the speakers of other languages. Unlike creoles, pidgins do not constitute the mother tongue of any speech community
[C19: perhaps from Chinese pronunciation of English business]

pidg•in

(ˈpɪdʒ ən)

n.
1. an auxiliary language that has developed from the need of speakers of two different languages to communicate and is primarily a simplified form of one of the languages, with a reduced vocabulary and grammatical structure.
2. (loosely) any simplified form of a language, esp. when used for communication between speakers of different languages.
[1875–80; extracted from pidgin English]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pidgin - an artificial language used for trade between speakers of different languages
artificial language - a language that is deliberately created for a specific purpose
Chinook Jargon, Oregon Jargon - a pidgin incorporating Chinook and French and English words; formerly used as a lingua franca in northwestern North America
Translations
لُغَةٌ خَليطَه
pidžin
pidgin
PidginPidginsprachePidgin-Sprache
keverék angolnyelv
blendingsmál
maišyta
pidžinvaloda, jaukta sarunvaloda
miešaná angličtina
karma/melez dil

pidgin

[ˈpɪdʒɪn] N (also pidgin English) (formerly) lengua franca (inglés-chino) comercial del Lejano Oriente
he used his pidgin French to chat up the girlsrecurrió a su francés macarrónico para ligar con las chicas

pidgin

[ˈpɪdʒɪn]
adj
(= mixed language) pidgin language → créole m
(= broken) → de cuisine
to communicate in pidgin French → communiquer en français de cuisine
n (= pidgin English) → pidgin m pidgin Englishpidgin English npidgin m

pidgin

nMischsprache f

pidgin

(ˈpidʒən) noun
any of a number of languages which consist of a mixture of English, French, Portuguese etc and some non-European (especially African) language. Beach-la-mar is a pidgin spoken in parts of the southern Pacific Ocean; (also adjective) pidgin English.
References in classic literature ?
She tried to talk to him, partly by signs, partly in pidgin French, which, for some reason, she thought would be more comprehensible to him, and she had half a dozen phrases of English.
Kwaque demanded, who to his beche-de-mer English was already adding pidgin English.
In addition to the traditional contact languages pidgins, creoles, and mixed languages, linguists here examine two new forms: multi-ethnolects and written language intertwining.
Readers of epics like Dante's INFERNO will find this akin in structure and drama, offering up an invented language blending extinct English dialects with Latin, Spanish, Korean and other pidgins.
It is a must for every linguist interested in pidgins and creoles, and I hope that it will soon also become a must for all speakers of Bislama.
Because Harman concentrates the bulk of her efforts on Stevenson's Samoan adventures with Fanny and Company, the dismalness of his hypochondriac "invalid" years fades as he learns pidgins, takes to wearing cotton sarongs, nestles tropical buds behind his ears, and battles jungle growth with his bare hands.
Personally, I find it ludicrous to suggest pidgins speak any language at all, let alone English.
Sharif themselves remark that "linguistic evidence for this genesis of Swahili is not easy to find" and that "the process of decreolization tends to obliterate the peculiar features of pidgins and creoles" (1994 : 67).
The two last papers of Tosco and Owens and Kaye and Tosco examine two documents describing the military Arabic pidgins which developed in Chad and southern Sudan at the end of the nineteenth century.
Perhaps because the rational choice basis of such trade languages (pidgins) is entirely obvious, pidgins have been defined out existence to keep traditional linguistic theory safe from embarrassing contact with rational choice considerations.
John Holm notes that "this contempt often stemmed in part from the feeling that pidgins and creoles were corruptions of higher, usually European languages, [by people] who were often perceived as semisavages whose partial acquisition of civilised habits was somehow an affront" (Holm, 1).
This comprehensive bibliography offers convenient access to the vast amount of material that has been published in the last 50 years on the intersection of language and education with regard to African American Vernacular English, English-based pidgins and creoles, Latina/o English, Native American English, and other vernaculars such as Appalachian English in the US and Aboriginal English in Australia.