Piero di Cosimo


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Piero di Co·si·mo

 (dē kō′zē-mō) 1462-1521.
Florentine painter. His works include Vulcan and Aeolus (c. 1486).

Piero di Cosimo

(Italian ˈpjɛːro di ˈkɔːzimo)
n
(Biography) 1462–1521, Italian painter, noted for his mythological works
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References in periodicals archive ?
More than half of the surviving work of Piero di Cosimo (1462-1522) is preserved in North American collections, most of it acquired between the 1890s and the 1930s.
In the rediscovery of El Greco about a century ago, Townsend sees a parallel to the painter's Italian predecessor Piero di Cosimo (1462-1521).
They wanted one of our great Piero di Cosimo paintings It's a really hard thing for us to lend.
Proprio rilevando una salda compresenza, specie dopo il primo decennio dei Cinquecento, tra decoro e licenza nell'interdiscorsivita cortigiana, Finotti passa in rassegna i momenti chiave dei revival satiresco: le mitologie padane di fine Quattrocento, la miniatura padovana, l'ecfrasi delle Stanze di Poliziano e il paganesimo silvestre dei suo Orfeo, il "distacco etnologico" (228) delle tavole bacchiche di Piero di Cosimo, l'appello a una religio rustica dei carmi latini di Pontano e Bembo e soprattutto il programma decorativo nelle regge di Ferrara e Mantova.
The well-known picture of Piero di Cosimo as a Renaissance eccentric is therefore largely due to Vasari.
The first preserved example of the soon-to-be ubiquitous Medici dynastic device of a single gold ring set with a point-cut diamond, in the form of a pyramid, appears in a Petrarchan manuscript, dating to the early 1440s and made for Piero di Cosimo il Vecchio de' Medici.
Vasari also mentions in the spate of his gossip that Piero di Cosimo was afraid of lightning, the cause of the blaze in his Forest Fire.
While the museum's collection includes exceptional Italian Renaissance masterworks by artists such as Andrea Del Sarto and Piero di Cosimo, it has traditionally been stronger in northern European works.
Anne Barriault's contribution on the life of Piero di Cosimo is appropriately placed within the section on Vasari and poetry, for she suggests that the biography, "a song of loss" (192), is constructed according to the conventions of the pastoral elegy, a common poetic form in the sixteenth century.
But when his son Piero di Cosimo (1416-69) attempted to claim patronage rights to the main altar of the Cathedral in 1447, he was politely rebuffed.
Significantly, in a manuscript of around 1765 by one of the resident monks, Filippo Tozzi of the Order of Servites, we read: 'Near this lunette is the holy water stoup, worked in white marble by Giacomo di Marco of Fiesole at the expense of Piero di Cosimo de' Medici, whose arms are to be seen on its foot.