pier

(redirected from Piers)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

pier

 (pîr)
n.
1.
a. A platform extending from a shore over water and supported by piles or pillars, used to secure, protect, and provide access to ships or boats.
b. Such a structure used predominantly for entertainment.
2. A supporting structure at the junction of connecting spans of a bridge.
3. Architecture Any of various vertical supporting structures, especially:
a. A pillar, generally rectangular in cross section, supporting an arch or roof.
b. The portion of a wall between windows, doors, or other openings.
c. A reinforcing structure that projects from a wall; a buttress.

[Middle English per, bridge support, partly from Norman French pere, piere (from Old French puiere, a support, from puie, from puier, to support, from Vulgar Latin *podiāre, from Latin podium, platform; see podium) and partly from Medieval Latin pera (from Old North French pire, piere, breakwater, possibly from Latin petra, rock, from Greek petrā; see per- in Indo-European roots).]

pier

(pɪə)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a structure with a deck that is built out over water, and used as a landing place, promenade, etc
2. (Architecture) a pillar that bears heavy loads, esp one of rectangular cross section
3. (Architecture) the part of a wall between two adjacent openings
4. (Architecture) another name for buttress1
[C12 per, from Anglo-Latin pera pier supporting a bridge]

pier

(pɪər)

n.
1. a structure built on posts extending from land out over water, used as a landing place for ships, an entertainment area, etc.
2. (in a bridge or the like) a support for the ends of adjacent spans.
3. a square pillar.
4. a portion of wall between doors, windows, etc.
5. a pillar or post on which a gate or door is hung.
6. a support of masonry, steel, or the like for sustaining vertical pressure.
[before 1150; Middle English pere < Anglo-Latin pera, pēra pier of a bridge, of obscure orig.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pier - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by pilespier - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats
bitt, bollard - a strong post (as on a wharf or quay or ship for attaching mooring lines); "the road was closed to vehicular traffic with bollards"
levee - a pier that provides a landing place on a river
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"
quay - wharf usually built parallel to the shoreline
shipside - the part of a wharf that is next to a ship
2.pier - (architecture) a vertical supporting structure (as a portion of wall between two doors or windows)
support - any device that bears the weight of another thing; "there was no place to attach supports for a shelf"
wall - an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"
architecture - the discipline dealing with the principles of design and construction and ornamentation of fine buildings; "architecture and eloquence are mixed arts whose end is sometimes beauty and sometimes use"
3.pier - a support for two adjacent bridge spans
bridge, span - a structure that allows people or vehicles to cross an obstacle such as a river or canal or railway etc.
support - any device that bears the weight of another thing; "there was no place to attach supports for a shelf"

pier

noun
1. jetty, wharf, quay, promenade, landing place The lifeboats were moored at the pier.
2. pillar, support, post, column, pile, piling, upright, buttress the cross-beams bracing the piers of the jetty
Translations
دَعامَةرَصيف، جِسْر
molo
molebådebro
laituri
lukobran
bryggja
埠頭
부두
moles
pirsas
dambis, piestātne
mólo
pomol
bryggapir
ท่าเรือ
cầu cảng

pier

[pɪəʳ] N
1. (= amusement centre) paseo marítimo situado como zona de ocio sobre un muelle o malecón; (= landing-stage) → embarcadero m, muelle m
2. (Archit) → pilar m, columna f; [of bridge] → estribo m, pila f

pier

[ˈpɪər] n
(= walkway) → jetée f
[bridge] → pile f

pier

n
Pier m or f; (= landing place)Anlegestelle f, → Pier m or f
(of bridge etc)Pfeiler m

pier

[pɪəʳ] npontile m; (landing stage) → imbarcadero, pontile; (of bridge) → pila

pier

(piə) noun
a platform of stone, wood etc stretching from the shore into the sea, a lake etc, used as a landing-place for boats or as a place of entertainment. The passengers stepped down on to the pier.

pier

دَعامَة molo mole Pier προκυμαία embarcadero laituri jetée lukobran molo 埠頭 부두 pier brygge molo píer, pontão пирс pir ท่าเรือ rıhtım cầu cảng 码头
References in classic literature ?
Meanwhile, upon questioning him in his broken fashion, Queequeg gave me to understand that, in his land, owing to the absence of settees and sofas of all sorts, the king, chiefs, and great people generally, were in the custom of fattening some of the lower orders for ottomans; and to furnish a house comfortably in that respect, you had only to buy up eight or ten lazy fellows, and lay them round in the piers and alcoves.
The entrance is flanked to the left by a round tower, with a sloping base, and there are several similar in the outer wall the entrance has piers of a gate, and on the east side the ditch and bank are double and very steep.
Edward II gave to Piers Gaveston a suit of red-gold armour studded with jacinths, a collar of gold roses set with turquoise-stones, and a skull-cap parseme with pearls.
A great viaduct runs across, with high piers, through which the view seems somehow further away than it really is.
People were actually clambering down the piers of the bridge from above.
A fleet of steam-tugs lies at anchor in front of the various piers.
Disko wiped the wet from his eyes and led the "We're Here" to Wouverman's wharf, giving his orders in whispers, while she swung round moored tugs and night-watchmen hailed her from the ends of inky-black piers.
This fashionable watering-place, with its eastern and its western stations, its piers, its groves of pines, its promenades, and its covered gardens, was, to Angel Clare, like a fairy place suddenly created by the stroke of a wand, and allowed to get a little dusty.
Bridges are begun, and their not yet united piers desolately look at one another over roads and streams like brick and mortar couples with an obstacle to their union; fragments of embankments are thrown up and left as precipices with torrents of rusty carts and barrows tumbling over them; tripods of tall poles appear on hilltops, where there are rumours of tunnels; everything looks chaotic and abandoned in full hopelessness.
Below, every point of vantage bristled with spectators, the roofs of the towering buildings, the public squares, the active ferry boats, and every favourable street intersection had its crowds: all the river piers were dense with people, the Battery Park was solid black with east-side population, and every position of advantage in Central Park and along Riverside Drive had its peculiar and characteristic assembly from the adjacent streets.
But in his poem called The Vision of Piers the Ploughman he says, "I have lived in the land, quoth I, my name is long Will.
On a thousand bridges and piers shall they throng to the future, and always shall there be more war and inequality among them: thus doth my great love make me speak!