pietism

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pi·e·tism

 (pī′ĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Stress on the emotional and personal aspects of religion.
2. Affected or exaggerated piety.
3. Pietism A reform movement in the German Lutheran Church during the 1600s and 1700s, which strove to renew the devotional ideal in the Protestant religion.

[German Pietismus, from Latin pietās, piety; see piety.]

pi′e·tist n.
pi′e·tis′tic adj.
pi′e·tis′ti·cal·ly adv.

pietism

(ˈpaɪɪˌtɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a less common word for piety
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) excessive, exaggerated, or affected piety or saintliness
ˈpietist n
ˌpieˈtistic, ˌpieˈtistical adj

Pietism

(ˈpaɪɪˌtɪzəm)
n
(Historical Terms) history a reform movement in the German Lutheran Churches during the 17th and 18th centuries that strove to renew the devotional ideal
ˈPietist n

Pi•e•tism

(ˈpaɪ ɪˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. a movement in the Lutheran Church in Germany in the 17th century that stressed personal piety over religious formality and orthodoxy.
2. (l.c.) intensity of religious devotion or feeling.
3. (l.c.) exaggeration or affectation of piety.
[1690–1700; < German Pietismus < Latin piet(ās) piety + German -ismus -ism]
Pi′e•tist, n.
pi`e•tis′tic, pi`e•tis′ti•cal, adj.
pi`e•tis′ti•cal•ly, adv.

Pietism

1. a movement, begun in the 17th-century German Lutheran Church, exalting the practice of personal piety over religious orthodoxy and ritual.
2. the principles and practices of the Pietists. Also called Spenerism. — Piëtist, n. — Pietistic, Pietistical, adj.
See also: Protestantism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pietism - 17th and 18th-century German movement in the Lutheran Church stressing personal piety and devotion
religious movement - a movement intended to bring about religious reforms
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
2.pietism - exaggerated or affected piety and religious zeal
devoutness, religiousness - piety by virtue of being devout

pietism

noun
A state of often extreme religious ardour:
Translations

pietism

[ˈpaɪətɪzəm] Npiedad f, devoción f (pej) → beatería f, mojigatería f

pietism

n
Pietismder Pietismus
(= piety)Pietät f, → Frömmigkeit f; (pej)Frömmelei f

pietism

[ˈpaɪɪˌtɪzm] npietismo
References in classic literature ?
I used to know her husband, and her too a little, before she'd joined the Pietists.
Now, as always, Clare's father was sanguine as a child; and though the younger could not accept his parent's narrow dogma he revered his practice, and recognized the hero under the pietist.
He particularly admires the early Lutheran Pietists because of their disinterest in denominational forms, which allowed them to move easily into the service of the Church Missionary Society.
The second half of the book surveys lay renewal movements from the second century, through the medieval Waldensians and Hussites, to the Anabaptists and Pietists.
He was one of the most committed propagandists and zealous organizers of the the Pietists and Philadelphian millennialists, says Shantz (Christian thought, U.
Although a corrected edition appeared in Boston in 1738, the damage, such as it was, was done: the European editions and translations that established Edwards as something of an international celebrity among revivalists and pietists stemmed from what Edwards considered to be a faulty text.
The pietists were willing to train and rely upon native catechists and pastors to carry the Gospel beyond the local mission church and outside the Danish colony.
One might say that he was one of the first postreligious pietists in America, deeply religious yet critical of the institutions of religion.
Drawing on sermons, handbooks, pamphlets, and a host of primary sources from pietists such as Richard Greenham, William Perkins, and Arthur Dent, K.
Integrating the results of research not only on radical reformers but also on humanists and magisterial reformers, Williams modifies his earlier views to recognize that Puritans and Pietists may have contributed more than Anabaptists to companionate marriage.
The largely forgotten voyage of a Swedish Moravian to Constantinople was but the first of several in whose wakes German Lutheran pietists, Anglicans, and the fledgling Methodists found themselves unsettled.
The Harmony Society was a group of German Pietists who arrived in the US in 1803 and ultimately build two villages in Pennsylvania, and a third in Indiana.