pig's ear


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pig's ear

n
something that has been badly or clumsily done; a botched job (esp in the phrase make a pig's ear of (something))
References in periodicals archive ?
Grimmy (left) made a pig's ear of the six-chair challenge when first eliminating studio-sized singer Tom Bleasby and then recalling him after chants of "bring him back" from the audience.
The translation reads: Capello was half-decent ages ago and made an absolute pig's ear of two big national jobs.
Mind you, the Prime Minister's not the only one making a pig's ear of it.
You wouldn't trust the hapless former Scottish Secretary to make a pig's ear out of a pig's ear.
It seems to me in what is an affluent area many would-be Labour supporters are doing very well financially on the back of coalition policy, and the discontent they are propagating, through maybe a social conscience, are in fact issues already devolved and that Welsh Labour are making a pig's ear of.
RESIDENTS of Caerphilly will read the Echo article ("I made a pig's ear over statement", October 8) with utter disbelief coming so soon after all of the trauma following the suspension of the council's three top officers now on bail facing criminal charges of misconduct in public office.
If we go to the sales this autumn can we buy a pig in a poke, is a bird in the hand worth two in the bush or are we making a pig's ear of the whole thing?
POLITICIANS love talking about constitutional change - but usually make a pig's ear of it when they try to carry it out.
But what everyone would also welcome is an assurance that the powers-that-be won't make such a pig's ear of things again.
I prepared my questions, rehearsed my delivery and still made a pig's ear of what passed for an interview.
I agree that a pig's ear is being made of the development, but I think that he is wrong saying that the residents of Stockton and Hartlepool are opposed.
Seeing as coal is being transported from Daw Mill by a German-owned rail freight company, DB Shenker, to a German-owned power station, Ratcliffe, it would seem the best solution would be for the Germans or Indians or Chinese to take over Daw Mill, buying it for a nominal pounds 1 instead of the pig's ear the present management is making trying to run this vitally important colliery.