Pigs


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Related to Pigs: PIGSA, BRICS

pig

 (pĭg)
n.
1.
a. Any of various mammals of the family Suidae, having short legs, hooves with two weight-bearing toes, bristly hair, and a cartilaginous snout used for digging, including the domesticated hog (Sus scrofa subsp. domestica syn. S. domesticus) and wild species such as the bushpig.
b. A domesticated hog, especially when weighing less than 54 kilograms (120 pounds).
c. The edible parts of one of these mammals.
2.
a. Informal A person regarded as being piglike, greedy, or disgusting.
b. Derogatory Slang A police officer.
c. Slang A member of the social or political establishment, especially one holding sexist or racist views.
3.
a. A crude block of metal, chiefly iron or lead, poured from a smelting furnace.
b. A mold in which such metal is cast.
c. Pig iron.
intr.v. pigged, pig·ging, pigs
To give birth to pigs; farrow.
Phrasal Verb:
pig out Slang
To eat ravenously; gorge oneself: pigged out on cake.
Idioms:
in a pig's eye Slang
Under no condition; never.
pig in a poke
Something that is offered in a manner that conceals its true nature or value.
pig it Slang
To live in a piglike fashion.

[Middle English pigge, young pig, probably from Old English *picga.]

Pigs

 (pĭgz), Bay of
A small inlet of the Caribbean Sea on the southern coast of western Cuba. It was the site of an ill-fated invasion on April 17, 1961, when a force of 1,500 US-trained guerrilla troops landed in an attempt to overthrow the government of Fidel Castro.

pigs

(pɪɡz)
interj
slang Austral an expression of derision or disagreement. Also: pig's arse or pig's bum

Pigs

(pɪɡz)
n
(Placename) Bay of Pigs See Bay of Pigs

Pigs

(pɪgz)

n.
Bay of, Bay of Pigs.
References in classic literature ?
Jo talks about the country where we hope to live sometime--the real country, she means, with pigs and chickens and haymaking.
Leaning out at the open window, he looked into an orchard where a fat sow wandered about with a litter of tiny pigs at her heels.
Shimerda: he was unable to meet a note which fell due on the first of November; had to pay an exorbitant bonus on renewing it, and to give a mortgage on his pigs and horses and even his milk cow.
She went with them herself to see the pigs and the cows, to look at the darkies laying the cane, to thrash the pecan trees, and catch fish in the back lake.
Sleek unwieldy porkers were grunting in the repose and abundance of their pens, from whence sallied forth, now and then, troops of sucking pigs, as if to snuff the air.
They had curled-hair works for the cattle tails, and a "wool pullery" for the sheepskins; they made pepsin from the stomachs of the pigs, and albumen from the blood, and violin strings from the ill-smelling entrails.
As to talking to them, or anything like that, I'm sure I have talked till I was tired and hoarse, telling them their duty, and all that; and I'm sure they can go to church when they like, though they don't understand a word of the sermon, more than so many pigs,--so it isn't of any great use for them to go, as I see; but they do go, and so they have every chance; but, as I said before, they are a degraded race, and always will be, and there isn't any help for them; you can't make anything of them, if you try.
One of the men had ten children; and he said that last year when a priest came and of his ten pigs took the fattest one for tithes, the wife burst out upon him, and offered him a child and said:
At one extremity of this patch of desolation, overhung by bare and forbidding crags which husbanded drifts of everlasting snow in their shaded cavities, was a small stretch of thin and discouraged grass, and a man and a family of pigs were actually living here in some shanties.
I think there is nothing more pathetic than to see one of these poor old childless couples taking a menagerie of yelping little worthless dogs to their hearts; and then adding some cursing and squawking parrots and a jackass-voiced macaw; and next a couple of hundred screeching songbirds, and presently some fetid guinea pigs and rabbits, and a howling colony of cats.
The children were then called, like so many pigs, and like so many pigs they would come and devour the mush; some with oyster- shells, others with pieces of shingle, some with naked hands, and none with spoons.
It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, which the Farmer, Death, had already set apart to be his tumbrils of the Revolution.