Pilate


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Pi·late

 (pī′lət), Pontius fl. first century ad.
Roman prefect of Judea who ordered the crucifixion of Jesus.

Pilate

(ˈpaɪlət)
n
(Biography) Pontius (ˈpɒnʃəs, ˈpɒntɪəs). Roman procurator of Judaea (?26–?36 ad), who ordered the crucifixion of Jesus, allegedly against his better judgment

Pi•late

(ˈpaɪ lət)

n.
Pon•tius (ˈpɒn ʃəs, -ti əs) fl. early 1st century A.D., Roman procurator of Judea A.D. 26–36?.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pilate - the Roman procurator of Judea who ordered that Jesus be crucified (died in AD 36)
procurator - (ancient Rome) someone employed by the Roman Emperor to manage finance and taxes
Translations

Pilate

[ˈpaɪlət] NPilatos

Pilate

[ˈpaɪlət] n Pontius PilatePonzio Pilato
References in classic literature ?
Named after Pontius Pilate, you know, that shot the apple off of William Tell's head.
said jesting Pilate,and would not stay for an answer.
It was nothing less than the copper plate Pilate put upon the Saviour's cross, and upon which he wrote, "THIS IS THE KING OF THE JEWS.
Pilate, for instance, who was an important character, got 4s.
Colum Hourihane's impressive survey of the representation of Pontius Pilate in western European art during the Middle Ages begins and ends with the same fundamental question: "Quid est Veritas?
Caesar's vicar, Pontius Pilate, twice asks Jesus whether he is a king (18:33,37) and, with typical Johannine irony, unconsciously proclaims the truth to the crowd: "Here is your king
IF WE WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT PILATE AND HOW HE FIGURED in the final hours of the life of Jesus, it helps to know more about the Roman Empire and its governors.
Bogus charges were laid against Jesus, but Pilate was not convinced that there was any reason for a death sentence.
PONTIUS PILATE IN HISTORY AND INTERPRETATION By Helen K.
Pilate, the famous literary midwife in Toni Morrison s Song of Solomon, functions as conjure woman, healer, mother, sister, necessary pariah, and caretaker of the community.
In fact, as we shall see, there never was a trial before the Sanhedrin; nor was there a Jewish mob that demanded Jesus' crucifixion and swayed Pontius Pilate.
He then examines the way Pilate conducts the trial in each of the four Gospels, presenting him as cooperating with the local elite, seeing a political threat in Jesus, and skillfully using his authority to elicit the support of the local people.