astrocytoma

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Related to Pilocytic astrocytoma: medulloblastoma

as·tro·cy·to·ma

 (ăs′trō-sī-tō′mə)
n. pl. as·tro·cy·to·mas or as·tro·cy·to·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
A malignant tumor of nervous tissue composed of astrocytes.

astrocytoma

(ˌæstrəʊsaɪˈtəʊmə)
n
a tumour of the nervous system which originates in and consists mainly of astrocytes(as modifier)

astrocytoma

a brain tumor composed of large, star-shaped cells called astrocytes.
See also: Cancer
Translations

as·tro·cy·to·ma

n. astrocitoma, tumor cerebral.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Recent reviews of the literature by Hader, et al and Sobowale, et al revealed secondary PNETs after brain radiation for retinoblastoma, pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, oligodendroglioma, and low grade astrocytomas.
The most common histological subtype is pilocytic astrocytoma (WHO grade I) followed by fibrillary astrocytoma (WHO grade II).
Lewis was just 20 months old when he was diagnosed with juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma – a rare, benign and slow–growing childhood brain tumour.
There were 8 cases of glioblastoma (GBM), 11 cases of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), 6 cases of anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), 2 cases of primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) and 1 case each of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATR), disseminated pilocytic astrocytoma, and medulloblastoma (PNET).
In this article, we present two patients (one male adolescent and one female young adult) who were diagnosed with pilocytic astrocytoma and developed cerebellar mutism after posterior fossa surgery.
They are also developing animal models of sporadic pilocytic astrocytoma for drug discovery and testing.
We report the case of a 34-year-old woman with a history of pilocytic astrocytoma resection and radiotherapy with ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement as a child who presented with altered mental status and nausea.
When a resident or fellow tells me that they think a tumor is a pilocytic astrocytoma because they see cells resembling "pennies on a plate," a big grin comes over my face because whether they realize it or not, they learned that directly from the master himself.
Pilocytic astrocytoma (WHO grade I) is a slow-growing cystic tumor occurring most often in young adulthood, with only a small portion (10%) located in the cerebral hemispheres (Jemal et al.
Family and friends of the Eaglescliffe youngster were devastated last year when they were told she had pilocytic astrocytoma - an inoperable brain tumour.
Once consultants confirmed there was a tumour, Jack was referred to Birmingham Children's Hospital where specialists diagnosed a juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma.