Pima

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Related to Pimas: Akimel O'odham, Pima Indians

Pi·ma

 (pē′mə)
n. pl. Pima or Pi·mas
1. A member of a Native American people inhabiting south-central Arizona along the Gila and Salt Rivers.
2. The Uto-Aztecan language of the Pima, closely related to O'odham.

[From American Spanish Pimahitos, Pimas, from obsolete Pima pimahaitu, nothing (misunderstood by missionaries as an ethnic self-designation).]

Pi′man adj.

pima

(ˈpiːmə)
n
1. (Plants) a type of cotton that has long threads and is used to produce good-quality durable fabric, towels, sheets, etc
2. (Textiles) a type of cotton that has long threads and is used to produce good-quality durable fabric, towels, sheets, etc

Pi•ma

(ˈpi mə)

n., pl. -mas, (esp. collectively) -ma.
1. a member of an American Indian people of S Arizona.
2. the Uto-Aztecan language shared by the Pima and Papago, esp. those forms of the language used by the Arizona Pimas.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pima - a member of the North American Indian people living in southern Arizona and northern MexicoPima - a member of the North American Indian people living in southern Arizona and northern Mexico
Buffalo Indian, Plains Indian - a member of one of the tribes of American Indians who lived a nomadic life following the buffalo in the Great Plains of North America
2.Pima - the Uto-Aztecan language spoken by the Pima
Uto-Aztecan, Uto-Aztecan language - a family of American Indian languages
References in periodicals archive ?
For more than 40 years, ARS researchers--in conjunction with University of Arizona scientists--have been developing superb new pima plants.
Today, virtually every type of pima cotton grown commercially in America has at least some ARS lineage, according to Richard G.
The uniqueness and clinical value of more than 30 years of cutting-edge research into the genetic mysteries and environmental factors causing this diabetic plague lies in the fact that it is backed up by a genetically identical control group, the Pimas from the Sierra Madre in Mexico, who suffer little or no problems with the dreaded disease.
Because brown fat appears to play a role in metabolism, Shuldiner's group examined the Pimas for mutations in the DNA that encodes this protein.
A third research team is investigating the Pima and Maricopa Indians.
The new research raises the question of whether large numbers of Pimas are born with insulin resistance, Bennett says.
Though the Pimas still gather some plants and wild game from the desert, they have largely shifted to a modern Caucasian diet.
facility also will use computed tomography on individual Pimas to study brain receptors for insulin.