Pinsk


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Pinsk

 (pĭnsk)
A city of southwest Belarus south-southwest of Minsk. First mentioned in 1097, it was the capital of the Pinsk duchy in the 1200s. Pinsk passed to Lithuania in 1320, to Poland in 1569, to Russia in 1793, back to Poland in 1921, and to the USSR in 1945.

Pinsk

(Russian pinsk)
n
(Placename) a city in SW Belarus: capital of a principality (13th–14th centuries). Pop: 134 000 (2005 est)

Pinsk

(pɪnsk)

n.
a city in SW Belorussia, E of Brest. 106,000.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pinsk - a city of southwestern BelarusPinsk - a city of southwestern Belarus  
Belarus, Belorussia, Byelarus, Byelorussia, Republic of Belarus, White Russia - a landlocked republic in eastern Europe; formerly a European soviet
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1657, when life was analog, Cossacks occupied Pinsk and began massacring Jews and Catholics.
She was born in Pinsk, Poland, a daughter of Constanty and Maria (Bulat) Czek and immigrated to the United States in 1949.
The new towns are Borisov, Minsk Region; Lida, Grodno Region; and Pinsk, Brest Region.
the camp was generally a cold quagmire, swept by piercing winds from Poland and the Pinsk marshes.
My grandparents came to Havana in the 1920s and 1930s from Warsaw and a village near Pinsk that was Russian or Polish, depending on the day.
Saalmann worked with senior researcher Sabine Kastner, a professor in the Department of Psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute; and PNI researchers Xin Li, a research assistant; Mark Pinsk, a professional specialist; and Liang Wang, a postdoctoral research associate.
A Security Police leader responsible for mass shootings in the Pinsk district, close to the area where Yosselevska had lived, invented as a defense an order by Eichmann.
These and other transport communications influenced the development of such cities as Vitebsk, Polotsk, Pinsk, Slutsk etc.
Born in Pinsk, Russia, in late 1905 as Fruma Nimtzowitz, she immigrated with her family the following year to the Brownsville section of Brooklyn.
There is good reason to believe that a small breeding population survived in the area of the Pripyat and Pinsk [3] marshes (Serzhanin 1961, Galaka 1964).
Original publication was in Hebrew in 1973, by the Association of the Jews of Pinsk in Israel, a group of Holocaust survivors determined to remember all that they could about the human activity in a culture that had flourished for 500 years in Eastern Europe, and then was wiped out.
Kapuscinski grew up in one of the poorest regions in the poorest part of east Poland, in the little town of Pinsk (part of Belarus since 1991).