Tok Pisin

(redirected from Pisin)
Related to Pisin: poison ivy

Tok Pis·in

 (tŏk′ pĭs′ĭn)
n.
A pidgin based on English and spoken in Papua New Guinea.

[Pidgin English, from English talk + English pidgin.]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
This moniker in the PNG lingua franca Tok Pisin is a stigmatising label, akin to 'slut', for women who sell sex or who are unduly mobile or promiscuous.
We can learn much about the richness of human relationships from Africa, India, Europe, and Papua New Guinea (which boasts the greatest linguistic diversity, and where Tok Pisin, an oral language until relatively recently, is used in school, happily co-existing with some 830 other languages).
b) Offical language(s) of the above places are: Australia (English), China (Mandarin); Hong Kong SAR (Cantonese and English); Papua New Guinea (English, Tok Pisin and Motu); Taiwan (Mandarin); and Vietnam (Vietnamese).
Children and some adults were also fluent in Tok Pisin, and only one person was fluent in English--two languages that became much more prevalent over the ten-year period in which two more fieldtrips were conducted, the most recent in 1992.
kill' (< PU *kira- 'hit'; UEW 666); MdE cavo-, MdM save- 'strike, hit, beat; kill' (< PU *ca[eta]a-; UEW 53-54; Aikio 2002:11-12); Tok Pisin kil-im 'hit, beat' (< English kill; -im is a marker of transitive verbs); Hawaiian pepehi beat; kill' (Pukui, Elbert 1986 s.
37 low candidature languages being taught in Australian universities, including Pitjantjatjara, were noted by Muhlhausler (1996) who commented on the scant attention paid to Indigenous languages as well as the absence of (Australian) regionally significant languages such as Bislama, Tok Pisin and Hiri Motu.
Tok Pisin, an official language of Papau New Guinea, leverages the syntax of Melanesian languages to transform the English words you, me, and fellow into distinct inclusive (yumi--an amalgam of you and me) and exclusive (mifela--an amalgam of me and fellow) forms of the first-person plural pronoun.
Languages: Three official languages are English, Tok Pisin, and Motu.
Through the pressures and influence of larger language groups, the essential use Tok Pisin in order to communicate between language groups and an National Education system that is, for the benefit of global relevance, English based, there seems to be very little space left for Usarufa.
After a month in Madang, I had learnt a few words of Tok Pisin (local Pidgin English), I had learnt new techniques for OT and teaching, and I had learnt more about eyes and refraction.
Er bod y pethau yma'n ddiflas ofnadwy, roedd bob amser bisin o Mars bar i'w gael os oeddwn yn cymryd y pethau yma'n hogan dda - ie pisin a dim bar.