Pitcher pump

Pitcher pump

A simply designed shallow well pump with an open spout that looks much like that of a pitcher. When a shallow well or a cistern were either next to the house or under it, a pitcher pump was often located in the kitchen next to the sink.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grandpa put electricity in the house in 1967, along with an electric pump just behind the kitchen, but he also kept the old pitcher pump at the well.
For many years I used only the pitcher pump year round, ignoring the electric pump.
He becomes accustomed to hearing the shortstop break to position and seeing the pitcher pump, turn his head, and deliver a pitch.
In the old drinking water cisterns, a small red brick box (usually 24" x 24" x 18" high) enclosed the foot valve of a pitcher pump.
There are two wells with electric pumps and we found a third well and put a pitcher pump on.
We had a pitcher pump, but the well was too deep for it.
From the holding tank the water is pumped into the house via pitcher pump in the kitchen sink.
If you're using an ordinary pitcher pump, raise the handle high for a moment, which will allow the water in the column to drop suddenly.
I ordered a pitcher pump from Lehman's (Box 41, Dept 2-KFGB, Kidron, OH 44626; they can also be ordered from many local hardware stores), and bought 1-1/4" galvanized pipe from a pipe company in Baytown near where I live.
A few years ago I bought an old-fashioned pitcher pump for our shallow well.
The loosely fitted board floor was covered with tarpaper and plywood, and a sink was installed with a hand pitcher pump attached to bring in water from an existing shallow well.
It is transferred to a 1,000-gallon plastic holding tank buried in the ground near the house, and then pumped into the house with pitcher pumps in the kitchen and bathroom sinks.