Pius II


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Pius II

(ˈpaɪəs)
n
(Biography) pen name Aeneas Silvius, original name Enea Silvio de' Piccolomini. 1405–64, Italian ecclesiastic, humanist, poet, and historian; pope (1458–64)
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Noun1.Pius II - Italian pope from 1458 to 1464 who is remembered for his unsuccessful attempt to lead a crusade against the Turks (1405-1464)Pius II - Italian pope from 1458 to 1464 who is remembered for his unsuccessful attempt to lead a crusade against the Turks (1405-1464)
References in periodicals archive ?
The contributors examine the crusade of 1442 and of 1443 in the Balkans, the Venetian-Ottoman peace of 1479, the commentary of Jacques Ammannati in 1469, crusading under Popes Nicholas V and Pius II, activities of Greek and Roman theology, Moree at the end of the fifteenth century, the capture of the Bosnian kingdom, cultural transfer in the Italian Renaissance, Bonfini on Dalmatia, some families of Dragomans, the crusade of Amadeus VI, the sources of Monaci, ship owners in Ragusa, the Hungarian-Ottoman truce of 1468, Sigismund of Luxembourg and the Patriarchate of Aquileia, Malta, and strange things that happened at the time of the Council of Florence.
So sudden and encompassing was the architectural imprint left upon the Tuscan community by its illustrious native son, Pope Pius II Piccolomini, that it might well have seemed--even to a visitor in 1464--as if the medieval past of the entire town had been eradicated and replaced by urban concepts and buildings created in accordance with the principals of the new architectural style of the Renaissance.
Paul's predecessor Pius II died in Ancona vainly awaiting the crusading fleet and army that would hurl the infidel back.
In fact, Pius II argued, against Coluccio Salutati and many other humanists, that the etymology of Turcus (or, as it was more often in the fifteenth century, the feminine Turca) did not derive from a metathesis of the Latin word Teucrus.
There is no need to make a case for the Commentaries of Pope Pius II (1405-64) as part of The I Tatti Renaissance Library.
Pope Pius II denounced slavery as "an enormous crime" in 1462.
Peter's but were then moved elsewhere, among them: Eugene IV, Callistus III, Pius II, Alexander VI, Leo X, Hadrian VI, Pius IV, Pius V, Clement VIII, Paul V, Gregory XV, Innocent X, Clement IX, Benedict XIII, and Clement XIV.
The town's center reflects the humanist ideals of Leon Battista Alberti, who consulted Pius II on his building ambitions.
In the early fall of 1942, the World Jewish Congress representative in Geneva, Gerhard Reigner, sent a telegram to Pius II, to Churchill, and to Roosevelt, detailing the information that the W.
Having nothing but an idea, she convinced the region of Lazio and the city of Rome to give her a dilapidated property on the Via Aurelia Antica, overlooking the Vatican, called the Villa Piccolomini (named after Pope Pius II, Enea Silvio Piccolomini).
On the contrary, slavery was condemned by Pius II in 1462, by Paul III in 1537 (Sublimis Deus), and by Urban VIII in 1639.
POPE Pius II believed Hitler was possessed by Satan and tried to drive the devil out of his body, a new book has revealed.