Pius VII


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Pius VII

Originally Barnaba Gregorio Chiaramonti. 1742-1823.
Pope (1800-1823) who crowned Napoleon emperor in 1804.

Pius VII

n
(Biography) original name Luigi Barnaba Chiaramonti. 1740–1823, Italian ecclesiastic; pope (1800–23). He concluded a concordat with Napoleon (1801) and consecrated him as emperor of France (1804), but resisted his annexation of the Papal States (1809)
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Noun1.Pius VII - Italian pope from 1800 to 1823 who was humiliated by Napoleon and taken prisoner in 1809Pius VII - Italian pope from 1800 to 1823 who was humiliated by Napoleon and taken prisoner in 1809; he concluded a concordat with Napoleon and crowned him emperor of France; he returned to Rome in 1814 (1740-1823)
References in classic literature ?
25 Frimaire; year XIII; Coronation of the Emperor Napoleon by his Holiness, Pius VII.
1804: Napoleon was crowned Emperor in Paris by Pope Pius VII.
as the Napoleonic Wars were winding down, Pope Pius VII signed the bull
10) Notable alumni of this academy were as follows: Carlo Rezzonico who would become Pope Clement XIII (1758-1769); Cardinal Ercole Consalvi who skillfully represented Pope Pius VII at the Congress of Vienna in 1815; Annibale Della Genga, later Pope Leo XII (1823-1829); Gioacchino Pecci, the future Pope Leo XIII (1878-1903); Cardinal Merry Del Val, who would serve as Secretary of State under Pope St.
The coronation for the self-proclaimed emperor was held later that year in Notre Dame, Paris, and Napoleon loosened his purse strings for the lavish ceremony, even paying for Pope Pius VII to travel to France for the occasion.
1804: Napoleon crowned himself Emperor in Paris - taking the crown from Pope Pius VII, who had expected to perform the actual coronation.
The Society would not come back until 1814, thanks to Pius VII, who restored it and called its members "skilled rowers for the storm-tossed barque of Peter.
Even the Roman pontiffs utilised jewelled portraits to promote the prestige of the papacy and personal loyalty, as can be witnessed in the unusual portrait jewel of a cameo habille framed with diamonds showing Pope Pius VII (1742-1823) praying at the altar of the Virgin of Sorrows (Fig.
Both Pius VI (1775-99) and Pius VII (1800-23) were imprisoned by Napoleon.
Here the first six cover the period from Julius II (reigned 1503-1513), the mediaeval prince, to Pius VII (1800-1823), the compromise candidate who suffered so much at the hands of the French.
In 1796 the Papal States were invaded by French forces, which declared them the Roman Republic, but papal rule was restored in 1800 and Pope Pius VII returned.