Paiute

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Related to Piutes: Digger Indians

Pai·ute

also Pi·ute  (pī′yo͞ot′)
n. pl. Paiute or Pai·utes also Piute or Pi·utes
1. A member of a Native American people inhabiting eastern Oregon, western Nevada, and adjacent areas of northeast California. Also called Northern Paiute.
2. A member of a Native American people inhabiting southern Utah and Nevada, northern Arizona, and adjacent areas of southeast California. Also called Southern Paiute.

Pai′ute′ adj.

Paiute

(ˈpaɪˌuːt; paɪˈjuːt) or

Piute

npl -utes or -ute
1. (Peoples) a member of either of two North American Indian peoples (Northern Paiute and Southern Paiute) of the Southwestern US, related to the Aztecs
2. (Languages) the language of either of these peoples, belonging to the Shoshonean subfamily of the Uto-Aztecan family

Pai•ute

(paɪˈut, ˈpaɪ ut)

n., pl. -utes, (esp. collectively) -ute.
1. a member of an American Indian people of the U.S. Great Basin region.
2. either of two Uto-Aztecan languages spoken by the Paiutes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Paiute - a member of either of two Shoshonean peoples (northern Paiute and southern Paiute) related to the Aztecs and living in the southwestern United StatesPaiute - a member of either of two Shoshonean peoples (northern Paiute and southern Paiute) related to the Aztecs and living in the southwestern United States
Shoshone, Shoshoni - a member of the North American Indian people (related to the Aztecs) of the southwestern United States
2.Paiute - the Shoshonean language spoken by the Paiute
Shoshonean, Shoshonean language, Shoshonian, Shoshonian language - a subfamily of Uto-Aztecan languages spoken mainly in the southwestern United States
References in classic literature ?
It is known that he was found by a family of Piute Indians, who kept the little wretch with them for a time and then sold him--actually sold him for money to a woman on one of the east-bound trains, at a station a long way from Winnemucca.
The crest line of the Piutes is fantastic, a postcard view of a California only a few ever see, and best seen from the saddle.
In her 1883 autobiography Life among the Piutes Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins gave a dramatic account of the arrival of white settlers and soldiers in the Pyramid and Muddy Lakes area.
Yensen has been the major contributor to preserving several species of ground squirrels, especially Northern and Southern Idahos and Piutes.
Lott, and Katharine Rodier make clear, Mary played an instrumental role in publications for and about children, then went on to sponsoring Sarah Winnemucca's Life among the Piutes (1883).
Senier studies three women of this period: Helen Hunt Jackson, the white author and activist famous for her 1884 novel, Ramona; Sarah Winnemucca, a Paiute activist whose Life Among the Piutes [sic] was first published in 1883 with the collaboration of white New Englander Mary Mann; and Victoria Howard.
Zanjani provides a complete road map to Sarah Winnemucca's life and also to her book Life Among the Piutes (1883), something earlier biographers have done only peripherally.