specific performance

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specific performance

n. Law
The carrying out of a contract according to its particular terms, especially as ordered by a court instead of paying damages for failing to carrying out the contract.

specific performance

n
(Law) law a remedy awarded by a court requiring a person to fulfil obligations under a contract where damages are an insufficient remedy

specif′ic perfor′mance


n.
literal compliance with one's contractual promises, as in the sale of land.
[1870–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.specific performance - the performance of a legal contract as specified by its terms
carrying into action, carrying out, execution, performance - the act of performing; of doing something successfully; using knowledge as distinguished from merely possessing it; "they criticised his performance as mayor"; "experience generally improves performance"
References in periodicals archive ?
Their filing stated: "Given Plaintiff's conduct in seeking and obtaining a restraining order that required Rob to stay away from Plaintiff and her workplace, no trier of fact could possibly find that it was reasonably probable that a second season of Rob & Chyna would have been picked up and filmed.
Given plaintiff's conduct in seeking and obtaining a restraining order that required Rob to stay away from plaintiff and her workplace, no tier of fact could possibly find that it was reasonably probable that a second season of 'Rob & Chyna' would have picked up and filmed," the court documents read.
Among specific topics are the intentional infliction of emotional distress, classifying defenses based on plaintiff's conduct, circumstantial evidence generally, duty and proximate cause, and defamation and invasion of privacy.
Bennett sees the citizen petition as a way to resolve the question of "whether the plaintiff's conduct involves or affects 'interstate commerce' sufficiently to fall within the proscriptions of [section] 1240.
However in cases where there is no conflict in the evidence, the defendants driver's conduct falls below any permissible standard of due case and the plaintiff's conduct was not involved summary judgment may be granted.
Jurors often used rhetoric heard in tort "reform" ads as heuristics, or mental shortcuts, to understand and explain the plaintiff's conduct.
The plaintiff's conduct created some risk of actually (and exclusively) causing the harm, thereby reducing the risk (and amount of liability) attributable to each defendant.