atmosphere

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atmosphere

at·mos·phere

 (ăt′mə-sfîr′)
n.
1. The gaseous mass or envelope surrounding a celestial body, especially the one surrounding the earth, and retained by the celestial body's gravitational field.
2. The air or climate in a specific place.
3. Abbr. atm Physics A unit of pressure equal to the air pressure at sea level. It equals the amount of pressure that will support a column of mercury 760 millimeters high at 0 degrees Celsius under standard gravity, or 14.7 pounds per square inch (1.01325 × 105 pascals).
4. A dominant intellectual or emotional environment or attitude: an atmosphere of distrust among the electorate.
5. The dominant tone or mood of a work of art.
6. An aesthetic quality or effect, especially a distinctive and pleasing one, associated with a particular place: a restaurant with an Old World atmosphere.

[New Latin atmosphaera : Greek atmos, vapor; see wet- in Indo-European roots + Latin sphaera, sphere; see sphere.]

atmosphere

(ˈætməsˌfɪə)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the gaseous envelope surrounding the earth or any other celestial body. See also troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, ionosphere
2. the air or climate in a particular place: the atmosphere was thick with smoke.
3. a general pervasive feeling or mood: an atmosphere of elation.
4. (Art Terms) the prevailing tone or mood of a novel, symphony, painting, or other work of art
5. a special mood or character associated with a place
6. (Chemistry) any local gaseous environment or medium: an inert atmosphere.
7. (Units) a unit of pressure; the pressure that will support a column of mercury 760 mm high at 0°C at sea level. 1 atmosphere is equivalent to 101 325 newtons per square metre or 14.72 pounds per square inch. Abbreviation: at or atm
ˌatmosˈpheric, ˌatmosˈpherical adj
ˌatmosˈpherically adv

at•mos•phere

(ˈæt məsˌfɪər)
n.
1. the gaseous envelope surrounding the earth or a heavenly body; the air.
2. any gaseous envelope or medium.
3. a conventional unit of pressure, the normal pressure of the air at sea level, about 14.7 pounds per square inch, equal to the pressure exerted by a column of mercury 29.92 in. (760 mm) high. Abbr.: atm.
4. a surrounding or pervading mood, environment, or influence: an atmosphere of tension.
5. the dominant mood or tone of a work of art, as of a play or novel.
6. a distinctive quality, as of a place; character.
[1630–40; < New Latin atmosphaera. See atmo-, -sphere]
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atmosphere
The Earth's atmosphere is divided into layers primarily according to differences in temperature. In the troposphere and mesosphere, air temperature drops with altitude, while in the stratosphere and thermosphere it rises. The exosphere extends indefinitely into space.

at·mos·phere

(ăt′mə-sfîr′)
1. The mixture of gases that surrounds the Earth or some other celestial body. It is held by the force of gravity and forms various layers at different heights, including the troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere, and exosphere. The Earth's atmosphere, called air, is rich in nitrogen and oxygen; that of Venus is mainly carbon dioxide. Compare asthenosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere.
2. A unit of pressure equal to the pressure of the air at sea level, about 14.7 pounds per square inch or 1,013 millibars.

atmosphere

- Derives from Greek atmos, "vapor," and sphaira, "globe," and is literally "ball of vapor."
See also related terms for vapor.

Atmosphere


the horizontal movement of elements of the atmosphere. Cf. convection. — advective, adj.
the branch of dynamics that studies the motions of air and other gases, especially with regard to bodies in motion in these substances. See also aviation. — aerodynamic, aerodynamical, adj.
the branch of meteorology that studies and describes atmospheric conditions. — aerographer, n. — aerographic, aerographical, adj.
1. Obsolete, the branch of meteorology that observed the atmosphere by using balloons, airplanes, etc.
2. meteorology. — aerologist, n.aerologic, aerological, adj.
1. divination from the state of the air or atmospheric conditions, sometimes limited to weather.
2. Humorous. weather forecasting. See also 124. DIVINATION.
the science of measuring properties of air; pneumatics. — aerometric, adj.
the region in the upper part of the earth’s atmosphere where the air is too thin for aircraft to operate properly.
an abnormal dread of fresh air. — aerophobe, n.
perception by means of the air, said to be a function of the antennae of insects.
Aeronautics. the area outside the atmosphere of the earth where manned flight is possible.
the separation of gases which are equally diffusible. — atmolyzer, n.
1. the sound, usually a crackling noise, heard over a radio receiver and caused by electromagnetic disturbances in the atmosphere; static.
2. the natural phenomena that create this disturbance.
a barometer which automatically records, on a rotating cylinder, any variation in atmospheric pressure; a self-recording aneroid.
the branch of science that deals with the barometer.
the art or science of barometric observation.
a branch of biology that studies the relationship between living creatures and atmospheric conditions. Also called biometeorology. — bioclimatologist, bioclimatician, n.bioclimatological, adj.
a form of divination involving aerial visions.
the vertical movement of elements of the atmosphere. Cf. advection.
an instrument for measuring the amount of oxygen in the air and for analyzing gases.
the highest portion of the earth’s atmosphere, from which air molecules can escape into space. Cf. ionosphere.
the outermost part of the earth’s permanent atmosphere, beyond the stratosphere, composed of heavily ionized molecules. It extends from about 50 to 250 miles above the surface of the earth. Cf. exosphere.
an instrument for measuring impurities in the air. — konimetric, adj.
the measurement of impurities in the air by means of a konimeter. — konimetric, adj.
the study of atmospheric dust and other impurities in the air, as germs, pollen, etc., especially regarding their effect on plant and animal life.
the study of fogs and smogs, especially those affecting air pollution levels.
a barograph for recording small fluctuations of atmospheric pressure.
the determination of the proportion of ozone in the atmosphere. — ozonometer, n. — ozonometric, adj.
a specialty in physics that studies the mechanical properties of air and other gases. Also called pneumodynamics.
the upper part of the earth’s atmosphere, characterized by an almost constant temperature throughout its altitude, which begins at about seven miles and continues to the ionosphere, at about 50 miles.
an instrument for measuring the weight of the atmosphere by the compression of a column of gas. See also instruments.
the zone between the troposphere and the stratosphere where the temperature remains relatively constant above a given point on earth.
the region of the earth’s atmosphere between the surface of the earth and the stratosphere.
an instrument used for comparing barometers at varying pressures against a standard barometer.

Atmosphere

 

See Also:AIR

  1. Air … full of unspoken words, unformulated guilts, a vicious silence, like the moments before a bridge collapses —John Fowles
  2. The atmosphere (of the room) was as vapid as a zephyr wandering over a Vesuvian lava-bed —O. Henry
  3. Evil which hung in … air like an odorless gas —Ross Macdonald
  4. (The circle in which I moved was a self-contained world …) it was like being in the treacly, supersaturated air of a hothouse filled with luxuriant vegetation, or in an aquarium with its own special heating unit and food supply, its own species of plankton —Natascha Wodin
  5. (The whole place seemed restless and troubled and) people were crowding and flitting to and fro, like shadows in an uneasy dream —Charles Dickens
  6. Sensed a wrongness around me, like an alarm clock that had gone off without being set —Maya Angelou
  7. They [women who run shops in a town] have given the Square a fussy, homespun air that reminds you of life pictured in catalogs —Richard Ford
  8. Thick and sultry the atmosphere steams like an island in the Pacific —T. Coraghessan Boyle

atmosphere

The name given to the layer of gases around the Earth and other heavenly bodies.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.atmosphere - a particular environment or surrounding influenceatmosphere - a particular environment or surrounding influence; "there was an atmosphere of excitement"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
genius loci - the special atmosphere of a place
gloominess, glumness, gloom - an atmosphere of depression and melancholy; "gloom pervaded the office"
miasm, miasma - an unwholesome atmosphere; "the novel spun a miasma of death and decay"
flavor, flavour, feel, spirit, smell, feeling, look, tone - the general atmosphere of a place or situation and the effect that it has on people; "the feel of the city excited him"; "a clergyman improved the tone of the meeting"; "it had the smell of treason"
2.atmosphere - a unit of pressure: the pressure that will support a column of mercury 760 mm high at sea level and 0 degrees centigradeatmosphere - a unit of pressure: the pressure that will support a column of mercury 760 mm high at sea level and 0 degrees centigrade
pressure unit - a unit measuring force per unit area
s.t.p., STP - standard temperature and pressure
3.atmosphere - the mass of air surrounding the Earthatmosphere - the mass of air surrounding the Earth; "there was great heat as the comet entered the atmosphere"; "it was exposed to the air"
airspace - the atmosphere above a nation that is deemed to be under its jurisdiction; "the plane was refused permission to enter Chinese airspace"
air space, airspace - the space in the atmosphere immediately above the earth
ionosphere - the outer region of the Earth's atmosphere; contains a high concentration of free electrons
region, part - the extended spatial location of something; "the farming regions of France"; "religions in all parts of the world"; "regions of outer space"
earth, globe, world - the 3rd planet from the sun; the planet we live on; "the Earth moves around the sun"; "he sailed around the world"
4.atmosphere - the weather or climate at some placeatmosphere - the weather or climate at some place; "the atmosphere was thick with fog"
atmospheric condition, weather, weather condition, conditions - the atmospheric conditions that comprise the state of the atmosphere in terms of temperature and wind and clouds and precipitation; "they were hoping for good weather"; "every day we have weather conditions and yesterday was no exception"; "the conditions were too rainy for playing in the snow"
air mass - a large body of air with uniform characteristics horizontally
anticyclone - (meteorology) winds spiraling outward from a high pressure center; circling clockwise in the northern hemisphere and counterclockwise in the southern
cyclone - (meteorology) rapid inward circulation of air masses about a low pressure center; circling counterclockwise in the northern hemisphere and clockwise in the southern
fogginess, murk, murkiness, fog - an atmosphere in which visibility is reduced because of a cloud of some substance
5.atmosphere - the envelope of gases surrounding any celestial bodyatmosphere - the envelope of gases surrounding any celestial body
exosphere - the outermost atmospheric layer
mesosphere - the atmospheric layer between the stratosphere and the thermosphere
sky - the atmosphere and outer space as viewed from the earth
stratosphere - the atmospheric layer between the troposphere and the mesosphere
thermosphere - the atmospheric layer between the mesosphere and the exosphere
troposphere - the lowest atmospheric layer; from 4 to 11 miles high (depending on latitude)
gas - a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely
6.atmosphere - a distinctive but intangible quality surrounding a person or thingatmosphere - a distinctive but intangible quality surrounding a person or thing; "an air of mystery"; "the house had a neglected air"; "an atmosphere of defeat pervaded the candidate's headquarters"; "the place had an aura of romance"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
mystique - an aura of heightened value or interest or meaning surrounding a person or thing
note - a characteristic emotional quality; "it ended on a sour note"; "there was a note of gaiety in her manner"; "he detected a note of sarcasm"
vibe, vibration - a distinctive emotional aura experienced instinctively; "that place gave me bad vibrations"; "it gave me a nostalgic vibe"

atmosphere

noun
1. air, sky, heavens, aerosphere These gases pollute the atmosphere of towns and cities.
2. feeling, feel, air, quality, character, environment, spirit, surroundings, tone, mood, climate, flavour, aura, ambience, vibes (slang) The muted decor adds to the relaxed atmosphere.

Regions of the atmosphere

ionosphere, mesosphere, ozone layer or ozonosphere, stratosphere, thermosphere, troposphere

atmosphere

noun
1. The gaseous mixture enveloping the earth:
2. A general impression produced by a predominant quality or characteristic:
3. The totality of surrounding conditions and circumstances affecting growth or development:
4. A distinctive yet intangible quality deemed typical of a given thing:
Translations
atmosféraovzduší
atmosfæreluftstemning
atmosfäär
ilmakehäilmapiiritunnelmaatmosfäärihenki
atmosfera
atmoszféra
andrúmsloftlofthjúpur; andrúmsloft
大気
대기
atmosferanuotaika
atmosfēragaisotne
atmosferă
ovzdušie
atmosferaozračje
atmosfär (n)
บรรยากาศ
khí quyển

atmosphere

[ˈætməsfɪəʳ] N
1. (= air) → atmósfera f
2. (fig) → ambiente m

atmosphere

[ˈætməsfɪər] n
[planet, Earth, Jupiter] → atmosphère f
(= air) → air m
(= ambiance) → atmosphère f, ambiance f

atmosphere

n (lit, fig)Atmosphäre f; (fig: of novel also) → Stimmung f

atmosphere

[ˈætməsˌfɪəʳ] n (Geog) (fig) → atmosfera; (air) → aria

atmosphere

(ˈӕtməsfiə) noun
1. the air surrounding the earth. The atmosphere is polluted.
2. any surrounding feeling. There was a friendly atmosphere in the village.
ˌatmosˈpheric (-ˈfe-) adjective
atmospheric disturbances.

atmosphere

الـجَوّ atmosféra atmosfære Atmosphäre ατμόσφαιρα atmósfera ilmakehä atmosphère atmosfera atmosfera 大気 대기 atmosfeer atmosfære atmosfera atmosfera атмосфера atmosfär (n) บรรยากาศ atmosfer khí quyển 大气

at·mos·phere

n. atmósfera.
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding what happened to the Mars atmosphere will inform our knowledge of the dynamics and evolution of any planetary atmosphere.
NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution probe, or MAVEN, has detected high-speed particles in the solar wind penetrating deeper into the planetary atmosphere than previously thought possible, mission scientists announced December 15.
computer modelling to figure out planetary atmosphere.
Life forms that can organise themselves into civilisations capable of broadcasting signals or travelling beyond the delicate envelope of their own planetary atmosphere are likely to do so only for a very short time, geologically and cosmically speaking.
There has been a confused planetary atmosphere surrounding recent events.
The results show just what fraction of the radiation reaches a planet's surface, as a function of the intensity and energy of the source and the thickness of the planetary atmosphere.
A spokesman for the journal said: "The molecules may have delivered, from their stellar birthplace, the carbon that is an essential element for life as well as the gases that contributed to the planetary atmosphere.
More epoch-making than the first winged flight would be the first created planetary atmosphere where human beings might fly under their own power.
A planetary atmosphere is made up of different gases, which are in turn made up of variants of the same chemical element called isotopes.
An oblique collision where an extraterrestrial icy body impacts a planetary atmosphere with a glancing blow could generate thermodynamic conditions conducive to organic synthesis.
The other, which can also alter the spectrum, is the tendency of a planetary atmosphere to act as a lens, bending or distorting the starlight passing through it.
The moon lacks the shield provided by even a thin planetary atmosphere, such as Mars, so lunar explorers will have to withstand the relentless bombardment of harmful solar radiation and pelting rain of micrometeoroids.