planetary ring

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planetary ring


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Planetary rings, made up of millions of particles, are known to orbit the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. They are rarely more than a few hundred yards in thickness but may be many thousands of yards wide. Saturn is thought to have more than 1000 separate rings.
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LUKE DONES, a member of Cassini's imaging team, explores planetary rings, the dynamics of comets and asteroids, and the impact history of the solar system at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado.
Both Chancia and Hedman are experts on planetary rings, as they study Saturn's rings using data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
The objects of their research include comets, asteroids, planetary rings, and Trojan asteroids.
comet tails, planetary rings, and star-forming regions) for over four decades.
These planetary rings are the first found outside the solar system.
Since young stars and disks are born in molecular clouds, giant clouds of dust and gas, the role of dust becomes an important feature of understanding planet formation; it relates not only to the formation of rocky, Earth-like planets and the cores of giant Jupiter-like planets but also to that of moons, planetary rings, comets, and asteroids.
The color blue made it very unique among planetary rings, which are usually red because the particles are too small to be affected by the plant's forces.
For instance, raised lines represent the color blue, and dotted lines denote planetary rings.
This latest analysis helps fill in that story with detection of impactors of a size that we weren't previously able to detect directly," said co-author Jeff Cuzzi, a Cassini interdisciplinary scientist specializing in planetary rings and dust at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.