planetary science

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planetary science

n.
The branch of astronomy that deals with the phenomena and objects found in the solar system and in planetary systems orbiting stars other than the sun.

planetary scientist n.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's great to see all this diversity up-close, says Peter Thomas, a planetary scientist at Cornell University.
Neptune is peculiar," says Craig Agnor, a planetary scientist at the University of California, Santa Cruz.
This is the first time anyone has found something in the solar system that is bigger than Pluto since 1846, when they discovered Neptune," says David Rabinowitz, a planetary scientist at Yale University in Connecticut.
It's incredibly exciting," says planetary scientist Britney Schmidt of the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta.
He's a planetary scientist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.
Such triple-star configurations are actually common," says Maciej Konacki, a planetary scientist at the California Institute of Technology.
The finding, from instruments on the Galileo spacecraft orbiting Jupiter, suggests that Europa may have all three of the ingredients scientists consider essential for life: an energy source, liquid water and organic molecules, said planetary scientist Thomas B.
GTE's technology has provided us with the communications framework that for the first time will enable us to visually study intricate details of the Martian environment," said planetary scientist David Paige, associate professor in the UCLA Department of Earth and Space Sciences and lead investigator for the international team.
It's disappointing because [methane] is a potential sign of biological activity," says study coauthor Christopher Webster, a planetary scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
Top reason: It's a steppingstone for living on Mars, says planetary scientist Paul D.
Clark Chapman, a planetary scientist with the Southwest Research Institute, said Europa's surface may be less than 1 million years old, although others believe it may be actually hundreds of millions of years old.
The Sagan Medal recognizes outstanding scientific communication to the general public by an active planetary scientist.