plankton

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plank·ton

 (plăngk′tən)
n.
The small or microscopic organisms that drift or swim weakly in a body of water, including bacteria, diatoms, jellyfish, and various larvae. Plankton is an important food source for fish and other larger organisms.

[German, from Greek, neuter of planktos, wandering, from plazein, to turn aside; see plāk- in Indo-European roots.]

plank·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.

plankton

(ˈplæŋktən)
n
(Biology) the organisms inhabiting the surface layer of a sea or lake, consisting of small drifting plants and animals, such as diatoms. Compare nekton
[C19: via German from Greek planktos wandering, from plazesthai to roam]
planktonic adj

plank•ton

(ˈplæŋk tən)

n.
the aggregate of passively floating, drifting, or somewhat motile organisms occurring in a body of water, primarily comprising microscopic algae and protozoa.
[1890–95; < German < Greek, neuter of planktós drifting, v. adj. of plázesthai to drift, roam, wander]
plank•ton′ic (-ˈtɒn ɪk) adj.

plank·ton

(plăngk′tən)
Small organisms that float or drift in great numbers in bodies of salt or fresh water. Plankton is a primary food source for many animals, and consists of bacteria, protozoans, certain algae, cnidarians, tiny crustaceans such as copepods, and many other organisms.

plankton

Microscopic aquatic organisms that float near the surface of water.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plankton - the aggregate of small plant and animal organisms that float or drift in great numbers in fresh or salt waterplankton - the aggregate of small plant and animal organisms that float or drift in great numbers in fresh or salt water
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
phytoplankton - photosynthetic or plant constituent of plankton; mainly unicellular algae
zooplankton - animal constituent of plankton; mainly small crustaceans and fish larvae
copepod, copepod crustacean - minute marine or freshwater crustaceans usually having six pairs of limbs on the thorax; some abundant in plankton and others parasitic on fish
congeries, conglomeration, aggregate - a sum total of many heterogenous things taken together
Translations
كائِنات حَيَّة دَقيقَه
plankton
plankton
plankton
svif
planktonas
planktons
planktón
plânkton

plankton

[ˈplæŋktən] Nplankton m

plankton

[ˈplæŋktən] nplancton mplanned economy néconomie planifiée

plankton

nPlankton nt

plankton

[ˈplæŋktən] nplancton m inv

plankton

(ˈplӕŋktən) noun
very tiny living creatures floating in seas, lakes etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Richmondian invaders with an identifiable larval type are predominantly planktotrophic (self-feeding) planktic larvae (67.
Planktic Cyanobacteria inhabit diverse aquatic environment from Antarctic lakes and nutrient-poor oceans to highly nutrient-rich lakes and ponds.
In his study, MacLeod analyzed the fossilized shells of 90 million-year-old planktic and benthic foraminifera, single-celled organisms about the size of a grain of salt.
However, dramatic changes in fossilized planktic foraminifera in the intertrappean beds at Jhilmili, Chhindwara district, Madhya Pradesh are an exception that provides the most accurate position of the K-T boundary in the Deccan to date (Keller et al.
In spring the Narva River is characterized by riverine phytoplankton: planktic cryptophytes from the functional X2-group dominated in the lower reach (Cluster 1 in Fig.
Bacillariophyceae), a widespread planktic diatom documented from North America and Europe.
Albian-Turonian planktic foraminiferal zonation and evolutionary trends in the Gebel Musaba Salama Section, West Central Sinai, Egypt // N.
All Copepoda (except Harpacticoida) and Cladocera were treated as planktic animals.
Planktic foraminifera of early Ypresian age do occur in Wenonah J-75, however, suggesting that the Acadia chalk may in fact be confined to the upper Ypresian.
2004, Size dependent isotopic composition of planktic foraminifers from Chukchi Sea vs.
aengensis appears within the range but slightly above the base of the L fluctivagus Zone, which marks the lower boundary of the Ordovician System just below the first appearance of planktic graptolites (Nicoll et al.