tropism

(redirected from Plant movements)
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tro·pism

 (trō′pĭz′əm)
n.
The turning or bending movement of an organism or a part of an organism in a particular direction in response to an external stimulus such as light or gravity.

[From -tropism.]

tro′pic, tro·pis′tic adj.
tro·pis′ti·cal·ly adv.

tropism

(ˈtrəʊpɪzəm)
n
(Biology) the response of an organism, esp a plant, to an external stimulus by growth in a direction determined by the stimulus
[from Greek tropos a turn]
ˌtropisˈmatic adj
tropistic adj

tro•pism

(ˈtroʊ pɪz əm)

n.
the orientation of an organism toward or away from a stimulus, as light.
[1895–1900; independent use of -tropism]
tro•pis′tic (-ˈpɪs tɪk) adj.

-tropism

var. of -tropy.
[see -tropy, -ism]

tro·pism

(trō′pĭz′əm)
Growth or movement of a plant or animal toward or away from an external stimulus, such as light, heat, or gravity.

tropistic adjective

tropism

the tendency of a plant, animal, or part to move or turn in response to an external stimulus, as sunlight or temperature. — tropistic, adj.
See also: Motion

tropism

Directional growth movement of a plant in response to a stimulus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tropism - an involuntary orienting response; positive or negative reaction to a stimulus source
response, reaction - a bodily process occurring due to the effect of some antecedent stimulus or agent; "a bad reaction to the medicine"; "his responses have slowed with age"
ergotropism - an affinity for work
geotropism - an orienting response to gravity
heliotropism - an orienting response to the sun
meteortropism - an effect of climate on biological processes (as the effect on joint pains etc.)
neurotropism - an affinity for neural tissues
phototropism - an orienting response to light
trophotropism - an orienting response to food
thermotropism - an orienting response to warmth
Translations

tropism

n (Biol) → Tropismus m

tro·pism

n. tropismo, tendencia de una célula u organismo a reaccionar de una forma definida (positiva o negativa) en respuesta a estímulos externos.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Darwin's Floral clock scene, the tensions between mechanistic fixity and organic change over time, as well as between conceptions of endogenous and exogenous stimuli motivating plant movements, limit these organisms' potential for sentiency and agency.
All this helped us understand why some contemporary critiques of native plant movements are misguided, an analysis we present in the section "Critical miscommunications".
And he said researchers across the UK were working with European colleagues to determine whether more stringent border controls for live plant movements should be introduced.