phytopathology

(redirected from Plant pathogen)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Plant pathogen: plant virus, Plant Diseases

phy·to·pa·thol·o·gy

 (fī′tō-pə-thŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The science of plant diseases.

phy′to·path′o·log′ic (-păth′ə-lŏj′ĭk), phy′to·path′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phy′to·pa·thol′o·gist n.

phytopathology

(ˌfaɪtəʊpəˈθɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Botany) the branch of botany concerned with diseases of plants
phytopathological adj
ˌphytopaˈthologist n

plant′ pathol`ogy


n.
the branch of botany dealing with diseases of plants. Also called phytopathology.
[1890–95]

phytopathology

The branch of botany that deals with the diseases of plants.
Translations

phytopathology

[ˌfaɪtəʊpəˈθɒlədʒɪ] Nfitopatología f
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
BmJ is a SAR activator with no direct effect on the plant pathogen itself.
Scientists examine seven areas in plant pathogen vector biology.
Harpin, elicitor of the hypersensitive response produced by the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora.
Peroxidase (PO) play role in lignification and subrization of cell wall during plant pathogen interactions (Low and Merida 1996; Wojtaszek 1997).
The first chapter provides an overview of the genus and its roles as a plant pathogen and a cause of human and animal disease.
Phenols and plant pathogen interactions: The saga continues Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology.
These mutants showed; a clear increase in the level of the expression of mycoparasitism-related genes during direct confrontation with the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani (Mukherjee et al.
It can stop plant pathogen spores from germinating, disrupt germ tube and mycelial growth and inhibit attachment of the plant pathogen to the leaf by producing a zone of inhibition restricting the growth of these disease causing pathogens.
Also, plant pathogen systems are ideal within the general area of disease ecology since at least one component of the system is stationary.
While some microbial biofungicides have been reported to also have moderate activity as SAR activators, BmJ is unique in that it works entirely as a microbial SAR activator with no direct effect on the plant pathogen itself.
ONSA scientists sequenced the genome of the chlorosis-causing Xylella strain, making them the first in the world to sequence the genome of a plant pathogen.
Twelve academics and researchers from the UK and Germany contribute 12 chapters to a practical text outlining current methods and protocols used in fungal plant pathogen identification, curation, quarantine, and quality assurance.