gummosis

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gum·mo·sis

 (gŭ-mō′sĭs)
n.
The pathological exudation of gum by a plant, such as a fruit tree, resulting from bacterial or fungal infection, insect infestation, or mechanical injury.

[Latin gummi, gum; see gum1 + -osis.]

gummosis

(ɡʌˈməʊsɪs)
n
(Plant Pathology) the abnormal production of excessive gum in certain trees, esp fruit trees, as a result of wounding, infection, adverse weather conditions, severe pruning, etc
[C19: from New Latin; see gumma]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gummosis - pathological production of gummy exudates in citrus and various stone-fruit trees
plant disease - a disease that affects plants
2.gummosis - disease of citrus trees caused by the fungus Phytophthora citrophthora
brown rot - any of certain fungous diseases of plants characterized by browning and decay of tissues
References in periodicals archive ?
carnifex nest we observed was hardened, so we do not know if wet mud alone was used or if saliva and plant sap were included as observed in R.
The finger and limb bone dimensions of Agilodocodon match up with those of modern tree dwellers, and its incisors are evidence it fed on plant sap," says study coauthor David Gross-nickle, graduate student at the University of Chicago.
Ensure that the landscape contractor has a solution for issues with plant-feeding insects like aphids and scales because these insects produce uneaten plant sap that can attract other pests such as Argentine ants.
Crop health will be monitored using plant sap analysis, a new technology being employed by Crop Health Labs in Bellville, Ohio.
The ants protect aphids from predators, and in turn harvest honeydew, processed plant sap excreted by the aphids.
Measuring the time it took from the insect settling on a plant to accessing the plant sap, the team showed that hardly any of the whitefly exposed to a range of smells started feeding within 15 hours from the time of exposure.
Like many pests, a whitefly feeds by pushing its long mouthpiece into a leaf until it reaches the nutrient-rich plant sap.
Male mosquitoes get all their energy from nectar and plant sap.
Among different insect pests reported on ferns, sucking pests cause more damage indirectly by sucking the plant sap, whereas beetles and caterpillars cause direct damage (defoliation) by feeding (Birkenhead, 1892; Hendrix, Amer.
I have always felt for patients with eye ulcers after wiping some irritant plant sap on my own eye.
What name is given to an insecticide which is absorbed into the plant sap stream after being applied to the soil?
Each of these insects feeds by sucking sugary plant sap and cell contents from the plant tissue.