plantation

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plan·ta·tion

 (plăn-tā′shən)
n.
1. An area under cultivation.
2. A group of cultivated trees or plants.
3. A large estate or farm on which crops are raised, often by resident workers.
4. A newly established settlement; a colony.

plantation

(plænˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Forestry) an estate, esp in tropical countries, where cash crops such as rubber, oil palm, etc, are grown on a large scale
2. (Forestry) a group of cultivated trees or plants
3. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a colony or group of settlers
4. (Agriculture) rare the planting of seeds, shoots, etc

plan•ta•tion

(plænˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an estate, esp. in a tropical or semitropical country, usu. worked by resident laborers: a coffee plantation.
2. a group of planted trees or plants.
3. a colony or new settlement.
4. Archaic. the planting of seeds, trees, etc.
[1400–50; < Latin]

Plan•ta•tion

(plænˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
a town in S Florida. 61,130.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plantation - an estate where cash crops are grown on a large scale (especially in tropical areas)plantation - an estate where cash crops are grown on a large scale (especially in tropical areas)
acres, demesne, landed estate, estate, land - extensive landed property (especially in the country) retained by the owner for his own use; "the family owned a large estate on Long Island"
orangery - a place where oranges are grown; a plantation of orange trees in warm climes or a greenhouse in cooler areas
2.Plantation - a newly established colony (especially in the colonization of North America); "the practice of sending convicted criminals to serve on the Plantations was common in the 17th century"
colony, settlement - a body of people who settle far from home but maintain ties with their homeland; inhabitants remain nationals of their home state but are not literally under the home state's system of government; "the American colony in Paris"
North America - a continent (the third largest) in the western hemisphere connected to South America by the Isthmus of Panama
3.plantation - garden consisting of a small cultivated wood without undergrowthplantation - garden consisting of a small cultivated wood without undergrowth
apple orchard - a grove of apple trees
garden - a plot of ground where plants are cultivated
lemon grove - a grove of lemon trees
orange grove - grove of orange trees
peach orchard - a grove of peach trees
Translations
مَزْرَعَه، مكان مَزروع بالأشْجارمَعْمَل ، مَزْرَعَه
hájplantážsad
plantage
ültetvény
ekraplantekra
plantáž
plantaža
fidanlıkkoruplântasyon

plantation

[plænˈteɪʃən] N [of tea, sugar etc] → plantación f; (= large estate) → hacienda f; [of trees] → arboleda f; [of young trees] → plantel m (Hist) → colonia f

plantation

[plɑːnˈteɪʃən] nplantation f

plantation

nPlantage f, → Pflanzung f; (of trees)Schonung f, → Anpflanzung f

plantation

[plænˈteɪʃn] npiantagione f

plant

(plaːnt) noun
1. anything growing from the ground, having a stem, a root and leaves. flowering/tropical plants.
2. industrial machinery. engineering plant.
3. a factory.
verb
1. to put (something) into the ground so that it will grow. We have planted vegetables in the garden.
2. to make (a garden etc); to cause (a garden etc) to have (plants etc) growing in it. The garden was planted with shrubs; We're going to plant an orchard.
3. to place heavily or firmly. He planted himself between her and the door.
4. to put in someone's possession, especially as false evidence. He claimed that the police had planted the weapon on his brother.
planˈtation (plӕn-) noun
1. a place that has been planted with trees.
2. a piece of land or estate for growing certain crops, especially cotton, sugar, rubber, tea and tobacco. He owned a rubber plantation in Malaysia.
ˈplanter noun
the owner of a plantation for growing tea, rubber etc. a tea-planter.
References in classic literature ?
Further away still, vegetable gardens abounded, with frequent small plantations of orange or lemon trees intervening.
They come from the shores of Narrangansett Bay, in the small province of Providence Plantations, and are celebrated for their hardihood, and the ease of this peculiar movement; though other horses are not unfrequently trained to the same.
That was exactly present to me--by which I mean the face was-- when, on the first of these occasions, at the end of a long June day, I stopped short on emerging from one of the plantations and coming into view of the house.
They only does down in plantations, where niggers, when they runs, has to do their own running, and don't get no help.
Many have suffered incomparably more, while very few on the plantations have suf- fered less, than himself.
To the left is Barton park, amongst those woods and plantations.
I began my discourse by informing his majesty, that our dominions consisted of two islands, which composed three mighty kingdoms, under one sovereign, beside our plantations in America.
The locomotive, guided by an English engineer and fed with English coal, threw out its smoke upon cotton, coffee, nutmeg, clove, and pepper plantations, while the steam curled in spirals around groups of palm-trees, in the midst of which were seen picturesque bungalows, viharis (sort of abandoned monasteries), and marvellous temples enriched by the exhaustless ornamentation of Indian architecture.
I suppose it was nearly eleven o'clock before we gathered courage to start again, no longer venturing into the road, but sneaking along hedgerows and through plantations, and watching keenly through the darkness, he on the right and I on the left, for the Martians, who seemed to be all about us.
Descending into the grotto, he lifted the stone, filled his pockets with gems, put the box together as well and securely as he could, sprinkled fresh sand over the spot from which it had been taken, and then carefully trod down the earth to give it everywhere a uniform appearance; then, quitting the grotto, he replaced the stone, heaping on it broken masses of rocks and rough fragments of crumbling granite, filling the interstices with earth, into which he deftly inserted rapidly growing plants, such as the wild myrtle and flowering thorn, then carefully watering these new plantations, he scrupulously effaced every trace of footsteps, leaving the approach to the cavern as savage-looking and untrodden as he had found it.
Some of the latter had been left by the Indians, and began already to assume the moss and inclination of age, therein forming a very marked contrast to the infant plantations that peered over most of the picketed fences of the village.
I will show you the new lodging I have had prepared for you during your leave of absence, and whilst examining the last winter's plantations and two saddle-horses I have just acquired, you will give me all the news of our friends in Paris.