meno

(redirected from Plato's Meno)

meno

(ˈmɛnəʊ)
adv
1. (Music, other) (esp preceding a dynamic or tempo marking) to be played less quickly, less softly, etc
2. (Music, other) short for meno mosso
[from Italian, from Latin minus less]
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, I have found that reading Plato's Meno (1984) alongside the Republic's (2005) allegory of the cave involves students in a drama that makes them self-conscious participants in the active pedagogy of a service-learning class.
Augustine starts from the worry in Plato's Meno that one cannot search for something entirely unknown and engages with Plotinus's Ennead 5.
Given this perspective, Tolstoy's passage reads as an echo of a passage in Plato's Meno dialogue, which features Socrates attempting to define virtue.
This problem, which goes back to Plato's Meno, can be stated as dilemma: in order for an analysis to be informative, one must be ignorant of the correct analysis, but in order to recognize a proposed analysis as correct, one cannot be ignorant of the correct analysis; thus, any analysis is either uninformative or cannot be recognized as correct.
They muse on Plato's Meno and feud with John Dewey.
For references, see Bluck, Plato's Meno [Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1964], 199-200.
In what follows, I argue that we ought actively and seriously to consider certain lessons to be learned from continued study of Plato's Meno.
In Plato's Meno, Socrates reminds us that before we can know whether virtue can be taught we must first know what virtue is, indicating that fundamental moral reform begins, and perhaps ends, with free discussion about political virtue.
In the course of his three pages on Meno, Seung cites what is still the single best analysis of that dialogue, Jacob Klein's A Commentary on Plato's Meno (1965), but Seung could not have understood a line in that book and still produce the naive digest of the dialogue that he records here (pp.
NOT EVEN NOW: his prose is so tight and lucid that even in your relative mathematical illiteracy you'll be surprised to discover, like Plato's Meno, that you already knew how to draw the inferences.
The problem, which first came to light in Plato's Meno, is to explain how knowledge is more epistemically valuable than mere true belief.
Dobell provides an interesting account of Augustine's early epistemology, and its relation to Plato's paradox of learning, as it is found in Plato's Meno (80d-e).