Plato

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Related to Platonian: Aristotelian, Platonist, Plutonian

Pla·to

 (plā′tō) 427?-347? bc.
Greek philosopher noted for his many written dialogues in which his mentor Socrates appears as the central character. The best known of these, The Republic, expounds Plato's idealist philosophy and describes a hypothetical utopian state ruled by thinkers. He taught and wrote for much his life at the Academy, which he founded near Athens around 386.

Plato

(ˈpleɪtəʊ)
n
(Biography) ?427–?347 bc, Greek philosopher: with his teacher Socrates and his pupil Aristotle, he is regarded as the initiator of western philosophy. His influential theory of ideas, which makes a distinction between objects of sense perception and the universal ideas or forms of which they are an expression, is formulated in such dialogues as Phaedo, Symposium, and The Republic. Other works include The Apology and Laws

Plato

(ˈpleɪtəʊ)
n
(Astronomy) a crater in the NW quadrant of the moon, about 100 km in diameter, that has a conspicuous dark floor

Pla•to

(ˈpleɪ toʊ)

n.
427–347 B.C., Greek philosopher.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Plato - ancient Athenian philosopherPlato - ancient Athenian philosopher; pupil of Socrates; teacher of Aristotle (428-347 BC)
Athens, Athinai, capital of Greece, Greek capital - the capital and largest city of Greece; named after Athena (its patron goddess); "in the 5th century BC ancient Athens was the world's most powerful and civilized city"
Translations
Platón
Platon
Platon
Plato

Plato

[ˈpleɪtəʊ] NPlatón

Plato

nPlato(n) m

Plato

[ˈpleɪtəʊ] nPlatone m
References in classic literature ?
This Right Whale I take to have been a Stoic; the Sperm Whale, a Platonian, who might have taken up Spinoza in his latter years.
And, not to speak of the highly presumable difference of contour between a young sucking whale and a full-grown Platonian Leviathan; yet, even in the case of one of those young sucking whales hoisted to a ship's deck, such is then the outlandish, eel-like, limbered, varying shape of him, that his precise expression the devil himself could not catch.
The cave metaphor at least partly inverts the Platonian cave because the prisoners can see the reality outside without any distortion.
3) One of the most significant aspects of Fukuyama's argument on liberalism at "the end of the history," however, is what he calls the "struggle for recognition" (xiii), which is based on a Hegelian view of history and Platonian account of self-esteem, thymos (xvi-xviii), though it seems that Michaels dismisses it as a replacement of belief with desire (Shape 9-10).