Plato

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Pla·to

 (plā′tō) 427?-347? bc.
Greek philosopher noted for his many written dialogues in which his mentor Socrates appears as the central character. The best known of these, The Republic, expounds Plato's idealist philosophy and describes a hypothetical utopian state ruled by thinkers. He taught and wrote for much his life at the Academy, which he founded near Athens around 386.

Plato

(ˈpleɪtəʊ)
n
(Biography) ?427–?347 bc, Greek philosopher: with his teacher Socrates and his pupil Aristotle, he is regarded as the initiator of western philosophy. His influential theory of ideas, which makes a distinction between objects of sense perception and the universal ideas or forms of which they are an expression, is formulated in such dialogues as Phaedo, Symposium, and The Republic. Other works include The Apology and Laws

Plato

(ˈpleɪtəʊ)
n
(Astronomy) a crater in the NW quadrant of the moon, about 100 km in diameter, that has a conspicuous dark floor

Pla•to

(ˈpleɪ toʊ)

n.
427–347 B.C., Greek philosopher.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Plato - ancient Athenian philosopherPlato - ancient Athenian philosopher; pupil of Socrates; teacher of Aristotle (428-347 BC)
Athens, Athinai, capital of Greece, Greek capital - the capital and largest city of Greece; named after Athena (its patron goddess); "in the 5th century BC ancient Athens was the world's most powerful and civilized city"
Translations
Platón
Platon
Platon
Plato

Plato

[ˈpleɪtəʊ] NPlatón

Plato

nPlato(n) m

Plato

[ˈpleɪtəʊ] nPlatone m
References in periodicals archive ?
The transition to religiousness B (Christianity) can actually be enabled by Socratic subjectivity, even though immanent Platonic dialectic affords no foothold for such a movement.
Sciabarra, however, rejects Platonic dialectic because it seeks to liberate reason from the bondage of the senses in search of an essentially mystical insight, a synoptic vision of the supersensible realm of intelligible beings.
Allen touches on Ficino's view of the possibility -- indeed, the necessity, as Ficino saw it -- of taking a philosophical approach to religious problems; on Ficino's opinions concerning the relationship of early Christian thought to later Platonism; on the manner in which Ficino cast the tenuous relationship between poetry and philosophy, given Plato's vigorous critique of the poets' place in society; on Ficino's conception of Socrates's daimonion; and on Ficino's hitherto neglected revival of Platonic dialectic.