deniability

(redirected from Plausible deniability)
Also found in: Legal, Wikipedia.

de·ni·a·ble

 (dĭ-nī′ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Possible to contradict or declare untrue: deniable accusations.
2. Being such that plausible disavowal or disclaimer is possible: "Covert action was deniable; a Pentagon program would not be" (Bob Woodward).

de·ni′a·bil′i·ty n.
de·ni′a·bly adv.

deniability

(dɪˌnaɪəˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n
the condition of being deniable
Translations

deniability

n (esp US Pol) → Möglichkeit fzu leugnen or alles abzustreiten; a way of preserving deniabilityeine Möglichkeit, ein Hintertürchen offenzulassen
References in periodicals archive ?
And whenever news does crop up of atrocities on Manus Island or Nauru, the Pacific outposts where refugees once bound for Australia are incarcerated, under the watchful gaze of taxpayer-funded private guards, the government invariably opts for plausible deniability.
A: These are popular media orchestrated parlor tricks designed to muddy the conversation and offer up some kind of plausible deniability for their audiences.
They're staying just short of that, trying to maintain plausible deniability, using their own propaganda In their own country to maintain popularity and so on.
Indeed, one of the hallmarks of magic as she presents it is its plausible deniability.
And the Iranian government won't hesitate to use vigilante groups as spoilers so they can feign flexibility while maintaining plausible deniability for the action of security forces.
In a thesis on cyber warfare published in January 2009, Major (now Lt Col) Scott D Applegate of the United States Army called cyber warfare an inexpensive, highly-effective means for a nation to achieve its political, economic or strategic objectives while maintaining plausible deniability for its actions.
No longer is plausible deniability acceptable, either for boards or for management," Temin continues.
This precedent then allowed for the cover of plausible deniability the region provided during the Afghan war.
The verbal communication has worked a little, but it eliminates accountability for the companies that have no intention of re-hiring, as there is plausible deniability.
At some point, plausible deniability ceases to be plausible.
Surely a clear conscience, or at least plausible deniability, would have been worth the wait of a year for both Baker and the University of Central Arkansas.
Yes, Michael, I am putting that in print and am sacrificing plausible deniability.