playmate

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play·mate

 (plā′māt′)
n.
A companion in play or recreation.

playmate

(ˈpleɪˌmeɪt) or

playfellow

n
a friend or partner in play or recreation: childhood playmates.

play•mate

(ˈpleɪˌmeɪt)

n.
1. a companion, esp. of a child, in play or recreation.
2. a social companion or lover.
[1635–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.playmate - a companion at playplaymate - a companion at play      
companion, comrade, familiar, fellow, associate - a friend who is frequently in the company of another; "drinking companions"; "comrades in arms"

playmate

noun friend, companion, comrade, chum (informal), pal (informal), cobber (Austral. or old-fashioned N.Z. informal), playfellow Children benefit from having regular playmates.
Translations
زَميل اللعب
kamarád
legekammerat
játszótárs
leikfélagi
soigralec
oyun arkadaşı

playmate

[ˈpleɪmeɪt] Ncompañero/a m/f de juego

playmate

[ˈpleɪmeɪt] ncamarade mf, copain (copine)m/fplay-off [ˈpleɪɒf] n
(after a tie)match m de barrage
(US) (for championship)match m de qualificationplay on words njeu m de mots

playmate

[ˈpleɪˌmeɪt] ncompagno/a di gioco

play

(plei) verb
1. to amuse oneself. The child is playing in the garden; He is playing with his toys; The little girl wants to play with her friends.
2. to take part in (games etc). He plays football; He is playing in goal; Here's a pack of cards – who wants to play (with me)?; I'm playing golf with him this evening.
3. to act in a play etc; to act (a character). She's playing Lady Macbeth; The company is playing in London this week.
4. (of a play etc) to be performed. `Oklahoma' is playing at the local theatre.
5. to (be able to) perform on (a musical instrument). She plays the piano; Who was playing the piano this morning?; He plays (the oboe) in an orchestra.
6. (usually with on) to carry out or do (a trick). He played a trick on me.
7. (usually with at) to compete against (someone) in a game etc. I'll play you at tennis.
8. (of light) to pass with a flickering movement. The firelight played across the ceiling.
9. to direct (over or towards something). The firemen played their hoses over the burning house.
10. to put down or produce (a playing-card) as part of a card game. He played the seven of hearts.
noun
1. recreation; amusement. A person must have time for both work and play.
2. an acted story; a drama. Shakespeare wrote many great plays.
3. the playing of a game. At the start of today's play, England was leading India by fifteen runs.
4. freedom of movement (eg in part of a machine).
ˈplayer noun
ˈplayable adjective
(negative unplayable) (of a ground, pitch etc) not good enough for a game to be played on it. Because of the rain the referee decided the ground was not playable.
ˈplayful adjective
1. happy; full of the desire to play. a playful kitten.
2. joking; not serious. a playful remark.
ˈplayfully adverb
ˈplayfulness noun
ˈplayboy noun
a rich man who spends his time and money on pleasure.
ˈplayground noun
an area in which children can play in a park, outside a school etc.
ˈplaying-card noun
one of a pack of cards used in card games.
ˈplaying-field noun
a field which is specially prepared and used for sport.
ˈplaymate noun
a childhood friend.
ˈplaypen noun
a small wooden structure with bars on every side in which a small child can play safely.
ˈplayschool noun
an informal nursery school.
ˈplaything noun
a toy.
ˈplaytime noun
a set time for children to play (at school etc). The children go outside at playtime.
ˈplaywright noun
a person who writes plays. He is a famous playwright.
at play
playing. children at play.
bring/come into play
to (cause to) be used or exercised. The job allowed him to bring all his talents into play.
child's play
something that is very easy. Of course you can do it – it's child's play!
in play, out of play
(of a ball) according to the rules of the game, (not) in a position where it can be hit, kicked etc.
play at
1. to pretend to be etc. The children were playing at cowboys and Indians.
2. used when asking angrily what someone is doing. What does he think he's playing at (=doing)?
play back to play (music, speech etc) on a record or tape after it has just been recorded (noun ˈplay-back)
play down
to try to make (something) appear less important. He played down the fact that he had failed the exam.
play fair
to act honestly and fairly.
play for time
to delay an action, decision etc in the hope that conditions will improve.
play havoc with
to cause a lot of damage to. The storm played havoc with the farmer's crops.
play into someone's hands
to do exactly what an opponent or enemy wants one to do.
play off (in games) to play a final deciding game after a draw (noun ˈplay-off)
play off against
to set (one person) against (another) in order to gain an advantage. He played his father off against his mother to get more pocket money.
play on
to make use of (someone's feelings, fears etc). He played on my sympathy until I lent him $10.
play a/no part in
(not) to be one of the people who are doing (something). He played no part in the robbery.
play safe
to take no risks.
play the game
to act fairly and honestly.
play up
to be troublesome or disobedient. The children are playing up today.
References in classic literature ?
In the mere exercise of the fancy, however, and the sportiveness of a growing mind, there might be a little more than was observable in other children of bright faculties; except as Pearl, in the dearth of human playmates, was thrown more upon the visionary throng which she created.
I knew a boy who, from his peculiar energy, was called "Buster" by his playmates, and this rightly supplanted his Christian name.
Cathy is a sufficiently good little scholar, for her nine years; her mother taught her Spanish herself, and kept it always fresh upon her ear and her tongue by hardly ever speaking with her in any other tongue; her father was her English teacher, and talked with her in that language almost exclusively; French has been her everyday speech for more than seven years among her playmates here; she has a good working use of governess - German and Italian.
Then quite a group of boys and girls -- playmates of Tom's and Joe's -- came by, and stood looking over the paling fence and talking in reverent tones of how Tom did so-and-so the last time they saw him, and how Joe said this and that small trifle (pregnant with awful prophecy, as they could easily see now
It was delightful to be rid of Seesaw's hateful presence; but otherwise the loss of several playmates at one fell swoop made rather a gap in Riverboro's "younger set," and Rebecca was obliged to make friends with the Robinson baby, he being the only long-clothes child in the village that winter.
I will revisit my lost loves, and playmates masterless!
Two playmates had Rob in these gladsome early days.
These rough waves are not fit playmates for so delicate a thing as you.
One imitative little imp covered his face with an old black handkerchief, thereby so affrighting his playmates that the panic seized himself, and he well-nigh lost his wits by his own waggery.
By way of showing her gratitude, the child besought them to go with her a little way into the fields, so that they might gather abundance of flowers, with which she would make each of her kind playmates a wreath.
Violet and Peony would not be aware of their immortal playmates,--only they would see that the image grew very beautiful while they worked at it, and would think that they themselves had done it all.
Now I remember comrades - Old playmates on new seas - Whenas we traded orpiment Among the savages.